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THE MUSE 



1903 



V 



Saint Mary's School Library 



DEDICATION 



To the Past, whate'er it's been, 

To the friends that we have known, 
To the memories, sail or bright, 

Like dreams that have past us Mown. 
To the failures we've withstood, 

To the battles we have fought, 
To the days that, short and sweet, 

With happiness were fraught. 

To the Present, as we stand 

Like ships in a sheltering bay, 
Waiting to-morrow's dawn 

To gayly sail away. 
Pausing in our voyage, 

Ere our leave we take, 
With many a backward glance 

To linger in our wake. 

To the Future, Ah ! how wide 

That vast horizon lies, 
Stretching in rosy tints 

Before our wond'ring eyes. 
May the lands as yet unseen, 

And the seas yet unexplored. 
For our barks untried and frail, 

Life's costliest treasures hoard. 



I32- + 7 



CALENDAR, 1902-1903 



September 18 — Advent Term begins. 

November 1 — All Saints' ; Founders' Day : a holiday. 
November 27 — Thanksgiving Day ; a holiday. 
December 22 — Christmas holidays begin. 

December 31 — Classes resumed at 8 :45 a. m. 
January 1'-) — Lee's Birthday ; half holiday. 

February 22 — Washington's Birthday : half holiday. 
February 25 — Ash Wednesday ; holiday. 

April 5 — Palm Sunday: Bishop's Visitation. 

April Ki — Good Friday: a holiday. 
April 12— Easter Day. 

May 21 — Ascension Day; a holiday. 
May 23 — Concert. 

May 24 — Commencement Sermon. 
M av 25— Class Day. 

yj av -){\ — Meeting of the Alumnae Association. 
May 27 — Meeting of the Board of Trustees. 
May 27 — Annual Concert. 8 : 30 1'. in. 
May 28 — Graduating Exercises. 

May 3d— Faculty holiday Levins. 



GREETING 




BENEATH the shady oaks of 
St. Mary's classic grove, 
THE MUSE bows with reverence 
to the honored past, and all the 
friends of olden days ; among the 
violet blooms of Spring, she ex- 
tends a warm welcome to the 
friends of to-day ; and with a 
hopeful heart, she waits to greet 
the acquaintance whom she 
may make. 



M |fw^ S^r. 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 



THE BISHOPS 

Rt. Rev. .1. B. Cheshire, D.D Raleigh, N. ('. 

Rt. Rev. A. A. Watson, D.D Wilmington, N. C. 

Rt. Rev. Ellison Capers, D.D Columbia, S. C. 

Kt. Rev. Junius M. Horner, D.D. \sh,vil]< . X. <'. 

CLERICAL AND LAY TRUSTEES 

NORTH CAROLINA 

Rev. P. .1. Murdoch, D.D. Dr. R. II. Lewis. 

Rev. Julian E. Ingle. YV. A. Erwin. 

Rev. M. M. Marshall, D.D. Charles E. Johnson. 

Richard H. Battle, LED. David Y. Cooper. 

EAST CAROLINA 

Rev. Robert Deane, D.D. Col. Wharton Green. 

Rev. T. M. N. George. Oh.. John W. Atkinson. 

SOUTH CAROLINA 

Rev. E X. Joyner. John R. London. 

Rev. W. 8. Holmes. II. P. Duval. 

ASHEVILLE 

Rev. McNeei.y DuBose, B.D. Col. T. F. Davidson. 

Rev. T. C. Wetmore. 0. M. Roystbr. 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

Rt. Rev. J. B. Cheshire. D.D. 
Rev. E. J. Murdock, D.D. Dr. R. II. Lewis. 

Charles E. Johnson. W. A. Ekwin. 

Dr. K. P. Battle, Jr.. Secretary and Treasurer. 

s 



22 



® 5 




FACULTY AND OFFICERS 



Rev. Theodore DuBose Bratton, D.D., ..... Redor. 

Mrs. T. I). Bratton Sclwol Mother. 

Miss Anne Saunders, ....... Rector's Assistant. 



FACULTY 

Rev. T. D. Bratton, D.D., . . Philosophy and Ethics. 

Kate McKimmon, ...... Writing. 

ELLENEEN E. Checkley, ..... History. 

Alice Edwards Junks, Ph.B. (University of N. C.), Latin. 

Eleanor W. Thomas, M.A. (Woman's College, S. C), English 

Margaret M. Junks. .... Mathematics. 

Marie M. Gerber, .... French and German. 

Addis M. Meade, A.B. (Bryn Mawr), . . Science. 

Marie E. S. Boyd, . Elocution and Physical Culture. 

Christiana Busbee, . . Greek, Assistant in German. 

Louise Pittenger, .... Assistant in English. 

Edith Thurston, . . Preparatory Department. 



ART SCHOOL 



Clara I. Fenner, (The Maryland Institute, School of Art and Design). 



MUSIC SCHOOL 



W. II. Sanborn, Director, 

Martha A. Down, . 

Gene C. Schutt, 

CHELIAN I'lXLEV, 



Organ, Piano and Theory. 
Piano iiml Elementary Theory. 



Piano. 

Piano. 



Mrs. W. H. Sanrorn, Piano. 

MrNNiE C. Newey, ........ Vocal. 

Charlotte Hull, ........ Violin. 



COMMERCIAL SCHOOL 



Lizzie Lee, 

Juliet Sutton, 



Principal. 

Assistant. 



KINDERGARTEN 



Louise T. Busbee. 



Miss Ciieckley, 
Miss Massev, . 
Lola E. Walton, . 
Mns. M. X. Quinby, 



Litii'iirnui. 

Assistant TAbrarian. 

Matron nf Infirmary. 

. Housekeeper. 



ST. MARY'S ALUMN/E 



ORGANIZED, MAY, 1879 

Mrs. Mary Iredell, President. 

Mrs. Bessie Leak, .... First Vice-President. 

Mrs. R. S. Tucker, .... Second Vice-President. 

Mrss Kate McKimmon, . . Secretary and Treasurer. 



'3 




U 




15 




,-A -A 



SENIOR CLASS 



OFFICERS 



Katharine de Rosset Meares, 
Julia Harris, . 
Florence Jackson Thomas, 
Mary Wood Winslow, 
Annie Gales Root, . 
Mary Allan Short, 
Annie Webb Cheshire, 



President. 

Vice-President. 

Secretary. 

Treasurer. 

. Poet. 

Prophet. 

Historian. 



MOTTO 

Like U|>|ic Oil live. 



COLORS 



( freeii ami White. 



FLOWER 
Four Leaf Clover. 

16 




[ Min tin' |>ink of courtesy. 



Caroline Mays Brevard, North Carolina. 

Associate Senior; TBS; L'Etoile German 
Club; Treasurer of 2A Literary So- 
ciety ; -A ; Secretary and Treasurer of 

Tennis Club, '02 ; Secretary of St. Cath- 
erine's Chapter, '03. 



But she was more than usual calm, 
She iliil not give u single damn." 




Katharine Moore Brock. . Mary lam 

Associate Senior ; Critic 2A Literary So- 
ciety, '02 ; 2A ; TA German ( Hub ; (PA. 



l 7 




'.Inv rises in mo like a summer's dawn. 



Annie Webb Cheshire, . North Carolina. 
Treasurer of Class, '02 ; Historian of Class, 
'03 ; EATI Literary Society : Editor- 
on-Advertisements of Muse. 



Education is the only interest worthy 
the deep controlling anxiety of the 
thoughtful man." 




Helen Gladys Davies, . South Carolina. 
Associate Senior; Historian E.\n Literary 
Society; L'Etoile German Club ; EAE ; 
[nter-Society Debater, '03, 



18 




"A fabric huge, 
Rose like an exhalation. 



Mary Day Faison, 
2 A Literary Society. 



North Carolina. 



'My true love hath my heart and 1 have 
his." 




Isabelle Gary, . . North Carolina. 

Associate Senior ; EAIT Literary Society. 




Do well and right and lei the worl 

sink." 



Elisb Moore Gregory, North Carolina. 

Historian EAiT Literary Society, '02 : EAI1 
Literary Society. 



" The race is not always to the swift. 




Julia Hamlet Harris, 
Vice-President of Cls 
ary Society. 



North Carolina. 
'03; EAI1 Liter- 




"A decent respect to the opinions of man- 
kind." 



Mary Ferrand Henderson, . North Carolina, 
Treasurer 2A Literary Society, '02 ; Secre- 
tary 2A Literary Society, '03 ; SA ; 
Secretary TA German Club, '03 ; TA 
German Club ; Dramatic Club ; Chair- 
man of Executive Committee, '03 ; FB2 ; 
Assistant-Literary-Editor of Muse ; Li- 
ter-Society Debater, '02, '03. 



: When Greek meets Greek, then comes 
the tug of war." 




Kate Heendon, 

EAII Literary Society. 



North Carolina. 




Il<- would not with ;i peremptory tone 
Assort the nose upon liis face lii- own. 



Marietta Belo Holman, 
EAII Literary Society. 



North Carolina. 



Procrastination is the thief of lime 




Octavia Winder Hughes, . North Carolina. 
Associate Senior: Secretary Mini Treasurer 
of TA German Club, '02; Vice-Presidenl 
of St. Margaret's ( lhapter, '02 ; President 
of TA German Club, '03; Treasurer of 
St. Etheldreda's Chapter, '03 ; 2A Liter- 
ary Society ; Dramatic ' llub . Mar- 
shal, '02. 




'A contented mind is a continual feast.' 



Mary Holton Hunter, . North Carolina. 
TBI; SA Literary Society ; President of St. 
Elizabeth's Chapter, '03. 



came nut, friends, to steal away your 
heart." 




Augusta Porch er J on us, North Carolina. 

Vice-President EAI1 Literary Society, '02 : 
President EAI1 Literary Society, '03 ; 
0A ; Vice-President Dramatic Club, '02, 
'03 ; EAIT ; Leader L'Etoile German 
Club, '02, '03 ; Captain Tennis Club, '02 
(Junior Class) ; L'Etoile. 



23 




women I ■;! l-i If il It ■■ 1 

face." 



•pt her 



Mary Exum Meares, . North Carolina. 

Associate Senior ; 2A Literary Society; TA 
German Club ; Treasurer of St. Eliza- 
beth's Chapter, '03. 



'Speech was given to man t( 
thoughts." 




Katharine de Rosset Meares, South Carolina. 
President of Class, '02, '03; President SA 
Literary Society. '03; Secretary -A Lit- 
erary Society, '02 ; SA ; Vice-President 
St. Elizabeth's Chapter, '02; Assistant 
Editor of Muse, '02 ; Editor-in-Chief of 
Muse, '03 : L'Etoile German ( !lub : Inter- 
Society Debater. "02, '03. 



24 




Which even critics do not criticise.' 



Eisie Roberts, 

EAI1 Literary Society. 



North Carolina. 



'Genius like humanity rusts for waul 
of use." 




Annie Gales Root, . ■ North Carolina. 
Class Poet, '02, '03 ; EAR Literary Society; 
Assistant-Editor of Musk. '02 ; Literary- 
Editor of Muse, '03. 



2 5 




I am as one who walks apart, 

I iniiiiiiii' from minor cares, 
I pray before the altar, Art, 

And copy off my prayers. 
It is my privilege to frown ; 

And if I do not choose, 
] (In nut pin my shirtwaist down, 

I do not tie my shoes. 
My soul would soar and why should 

Keep its proud pinions pent'.' 
Ye, yourselves, make way for my 

Artistic temperament.' 



Mary Allan Short, 



North ( 'arolina. 



Class Prophet; Editor-on-Ilhistrations of 
Musk, '03; Vice-President of SA Liter- 
ary Society, '02; 2A Literary Society; 
President of Tennis Club, '1)2; L'Etoile 
( ierman ( Hub ; Secretary of St. Etheldre- 
da's Chapter, '03. 



One may smile, and smile, and yet lie a 

villain." 




Florence Jackson Thomas, . North Carolina. 
Secretary of Class, '03; Treasurer of 2A Lit- 
erary Society, '02 ; President of St. 
Catherine's Chapter, '02, '03; President 
Altai- Guild, '03; L'Etoile German 
Club; rB2: SA. 



26 




And there, though last, not least. 



Mary Wood Winslow, North Carolina. 

Corresponding Secretary of SA Literal")' So- 
ciety, '02, '03 ; Secretary of Class, '02 ; 
Treasurer of Class, '03 ; Business Man- 
ager of Muse, '03 ; 2A Literary So- 
ciety ; L'Etoile German Club ; AK>1'. 



"V 






27 



CLASS HISTORY 




HE HISTORY of the Class of "naughty-three" 
begins with our Sophomore year. Some few of 
us started in Miss Katie's room, then were pro- 
moted tn Mrs. McBee's, and at last to the Big 
School-room. ( >h ! the dignity of reaching the 
Hi<i' School-room — bul oh ' the humiliation of 
being sent bae'< to Mrs. McBee's room for <_ci «^- 
gling, which calamity befell this dignified class 

110 less tliall three times. YOU see even SO 

long ago as that we laughed. But that was in 
the clays of our childhood. When our class 
really became a class we wen — well not quite grown, but we were Sophomores. 

We have always been accused of being a conceited class, hut in those dear 
old davs when we were " smiling, simpering Sophs, seldom seen solemn," I 
think our self-satisfaction was at its height. We were proud of being Sophs, 
and then, too, we were Miss Stone's girls, which by itself is a good enough 
reason for pride. We actually snubbed the Seniors in those old days. 

In our Junior year our class was made complete. All the girls who are 
with us now came that year. We became more dignified then. We felt that 
wc must patronize the new girls and show them what St. Mary's Juniors ought to 
be. That was one of our happiest years — welcoming the new girls and finding 
out how much nicer our class was for having them with us. And now our Senior 
year has come and almost gone. We are old and settled now. and have reached 
the limit of our dignity. Not hut once this year have we been scolded for noise. 

But we must not close our history without any mention of our studies. We 
are the reconstruction class. We started under the old regime and are linish- 
ing under the new. < »urs has been a time of new experiments and new sched- 
ules. It seems hi us that we have had a very hard time. First, just as we 
were looking forward In graduating the standard was raised and we had hi go 
two extra years In school. And then, wdiat other class has ever had to study 
Kellogg's English Literature, or had so many Soph themes to write or so much 
Junior English to read'.' And in all our studies we have had just the same 



2S 



hard times. But we arc not at all crushed by these woes, fur we arc still 
rather conceited, hut we have cause to he, in think. 

But now our happy school days are almosl over. 1 call them "happy" for 
they seem so, now thai they are almost gone. We have sighed and longed 
for these last days, but now they have conic we are not quite sure whether or 
not we are really tired of school. We all love St. Mary's more than we have 
realized. But we will not say a final good-bye now that we arc about to leave, 
for we hope to come back many limes and have many class reunions, and let 
happen what will, we will always he St. Mary's n'irls. 




29 



CLASS PROPHECY 



As the youngest member of nineteen three, 

It has fallen to my lot to be 

The prophet of that noble class. 

To predict what fates will come to pass. 



A soft spring morn, a wedding peal, 

Near to the rail doth Annie kneel ; 

Now through the door I see inside 

In the light of the candles lair Annie a bridi — 

Ever blighting her youth in its early spring-tide. 



Mary Day Faison will continue to write: 

All kinds of people she will delight. 

Right soon for the Home Journal she'll he. I regret. 

Young ladies' " Aunt Mary " on etiquette. 



Elise will lead a domestic life. 

Little caring for ambition's strife. 

In her home, ever thoughtful yet gay, 

She will soon have all things under her sway. 

E'en by soothing and helping the cares of each day. 



Julia will follow a scholar's life ; 
Universities she'll attend in ambition's strife 
Latin degrees will lie her desire. 
In years she will her highest aim reach. 
At Wake Forest College Latin to teach. 



3^ 



Mary Henderson also will be exempted 
All monotonies of life. She by ambition tempted 
Really, will the Nation's politics overawe, 
Yea, as the first woman governor of Arkansas. 



Many years will nol over Mary Ilolnian pass, 
Although comforts of home around her mass. 
Risking success, she'll to Washington go. 
Yearning to take a finishing-school in tow. 



Much fame will Mary Hunter win 
As heard above such usual din, 
Resulting from her marvelous voice, 
Yet ranking first as America's choice. 



Kindred minds always arise, 

And after years cause great surprise 

To friends of Kate Mearcs — they will hear 

Her plans are changed, plans held so dear, 

And her career in the literary world, 

Richly rewarded for such a mere girl, 

Is suddenly, completely overthrown. 

Now as a proof how her love has grown, 

fen for a man. her hopes are down. 



Annie Root can do glval things ; 

Now and then a song she sings, 

Never fears a poet's fate, 

Is an adept in debate ; 

E'er long she'll become quite great. 



M. Allan Short will study bard. 

And her craving for Art naught can retard. 

Rising to fame she'll soon appear, 

Yes, illustrating all the books of the year. 



31 



Fair, 1 > i • I :_^ 1 1 1 and loving though she I ■< ■. 

Looking through the years, I see 

OVr Florence a great change steal, 

Resolving thus her fate to seal : 

E'en renouncing this life to become u nun. 

Nought doing hut good deeds iii every one. 

Called always a Saint, fair is her fame, 
Each St. Mary's Chanter bearing her name 



Mae will he a society belle ; 

As a Senator's wife she'll in Washington dwel 

Every day full of pleasures anil treats as well. 



32 



CLASS POEM 



(Hi, sweet the days we've had together, 
Oh, sad the days when we must sever, 
But through life's journey let us ever 
" Loke uppe on live." 

Though each her way in life must start, 
Our souls will never feel apart; 
This motto holds us heart to heart, 
" Loke uppe on live." 

And we .if the Class of " Naughty-three, 1 
No matter where our work may he, 
We'll keep this in our memory, 
" Loke uppe on live." 



33 




:>4 



JUNIOR CLASS 



MOTTO 



Vita vocat. 



FLOWER 



COLORS 



Marechal Niel Rose. Garnet and Cream 



OFFICERS 



Cornelia Coleman, 
Lucy Taylor Redwood, 
Margaret Gray Stedman, 
Hellek Dorland Brock, 

Axx KlMBERLY GlFFOKT), 

Lily Piedmont Skinner, 



President. 
'-President. 
Secretary. 
Treasurer. 
I'listorictv . 
Poet. 



ROLL 



Rosalie Bernhardt, 
Virginia Bland, 
Josephine Bowen, 
Hellen Brock, 
Eliza Brown, 
Isabel Brumby, 
Minnie Burgwyn, 
Lillian Clark, 
( lornelia Coleman, 
Harriet Davies, 
Belle Dardcn, 
Virgie Eldridge, 
Mary Gramling, 



Ann Giffbrd, 
Boiling Hubard, 
Mavjorie Ilughson, 
Dora McRae, 
Elizabeth Massey, 
Esther Means, 
< 'arrie Moore, 
Lucy Redwood, 
Hallie Robertson, 
Lily Skinner, 
Margaret Stedman, 
Sumter Thomas, 
Mildred Tilton, 



35 




36 



SOPHOMORE CLASS 



MOTTO 



FLOWER 



COLORS 



\rc et spera. 



Red Ros. 



Maroon and Grey. 



OFFICERS 



Mary Graves, 
Julia Haughton, . 
Sadie Jenkins, 
Caro Gray, . 
Norcott Broadfoot, 



President. 
Secretary. 
Treasurer. 
Historian. 

Port. 



ROLL 



Susie Battle. 
Heloise Beebe. 
Margaret Bridgers. 
Norcott Broadfoot. 
Janie Brown, 
.lean Carson. 
Rena Clark. 
Mattie Chaffee. 
Caroline Covvles. 
Florence Cowles. 
Mary Dixon. 
Ellen Dortcli. 
Margaret DuBose. 
Ida Evans. 
Pearl Fort. 



Elmer George. 
Caro Gray. 
Florence Grant. 
Mary Graves. 
Daisy Greene. 
Elsie Gudger. 
Metta Gulley. 
Eliza Hamlin. 
Minna Hampton. 
Mary Harrison. 
Julia Haughton. 
Dorothy Hughson. 
Susie Iden. 
Sadie Jenkins. 
Mary McKimmon. 



.Mary Payne. 

I tallie Robertson. 

Isabel Ruff. 

Mary Sturgeon. 
Lucy Tayloe. 
Linda Tillinghast. 
Rosa Thomas. 
Sara Tyler. 
Cantey Venable. 
Ernestine Vick. 
Evelyn Weeks. 
Carrie Williams. 
Marie Williams. 
Susie Wood. 
Leize Weaver. 



37 




38 




: SHMAN CLASS 



iWER 



Paiis . 



COL 



' : 



OFFICERS 



I 



"'i ■ : nl 
i i.re-Pri 

Savefa.ri) 

i 





FRESHMAN CLASS 



FLOWER 



Pansv 



MOTTO 



COLORS 



Milites lx>i iniii militani. 



Dark Blue and Old Gold. 



OFFICERS 



•Jennie Murchison, 
Harriet Meares, 
Mary Leigh Robinson, 
Amy FitzSimons, 



President. 

Vice-President. 

Secretary. 

Treasurer. 



39 



ROLL 

Cornelia Arthur, Mattie Jones, Annie Sloan, 

Josephine Boylan, Annie Lamb, Alice Spruill, 

Florida Cotton, Harriet Meares, Roberta Stuart, 

Amy FitzSiinons, Olive Morrill, Nannie Smith, 

Glenn Forbes, Jennie Murehison, Elizabeth Temple, 

Ruth Foster. Annie Gray Nash, Augusta Watts. 

Catherine Foster, Marie Poinier, Fannie Williams. 

Olive Gaskill, Mary Robinson, Sadie Williams. 

Virgilia Glazebrook, Harriet Ruff, Amorel Wbotten, 

Louise Greenleaf, Floy Huff, Nora Zimmerman, 

Clifford Heyward, Nannie Smith. Eloise Zimmerman. 

Margaret Sanborn, 



BUSINESS DEPARTMENT 



Susie Gray Baker, Mabel Massey, 

Annie Dye, Eliza McGehee, 

Mamie Ellison, Lacy Robertson. 

Louise Evans, Mary Sherwood, 

Laura Gwyn, Katharine Spach, 

Campbell Jones, Lucy Tayloe, 

Violet Keith, Elodia Yancey. 



40 



Literary Societies 



41 




42 






SIGMA LAMBDA LITERARY SOCIETY 



MOTTO 



Lit with the sun. 



FLOWER 
Yellow Jessamine. 



COLORS 
Purple and < !rav. 



Advent Terra. 
Katharine Meares, 
Mary Short, . 
Mary Henderson, . 
Lucy Redwood, 
Florence Thomas, 
Katharine Brock, 
Sadie Jenkins, 
Margaret Bridgers, 



OFFICERS 

President 
1 r ice-Presidt nt 
Secretary 
Cor. Secretary 
Treasurer 
Critic . 
Teller . 
Teller . 



Easter Terra. 
Katharine Meares. 
Minnie Burgwyn. 
Mary Henderson. 
Mae Winslow. 
Caro Brevard. 
Isabel Brumby. 
Sadie Jenkins. 
Harriet Meares. 



43 



ROLL 



Rosalie Bernhardt, 

Josephine Bowen, 
Josephine Boylan, 
Caro Brevard, 
Margaret Bridgers, 
Norcott Broadfoot, 
Hellen Brock, 
Katharine Brock, 
Eliza Brown, 
Isabel Brumby, 
Minnie Burgwyn, 
Jean Carson, 
Lillian Clark, 
Carrie Cowles, 
Margaret DuBose, 
Ida Evans, 
Mary Faison, 
Amy FitzSimons, 
Virgilia ( flazebrook, 



Mary Gramling, 
Florence Grant, 
Mary Graves, 
Tallulah Gregg, 
Laura Gwyn, 
Elsa Gudger, 
Alice Haughton, 
Janie Haughton, 
Mary Henderson, 
Bulling Ilubard, 
Octavia Hughes, 
Marjorio Hughson, 
Dorothy Hughson, 
Mary Hunter, 
Sadie Jenkins, 
Mattie Jones, 
Dora MacRae, 
Mary Meares, 
Katharine Meares, 
Harriet Meares, 



May Montague, 
Belle Moncure, 
Jennie Murehison, 
Mary Payne, 
Luc)' Redwood, 
Mary Robinson, 
Mary Short, 
Lily Skinner, 
Nannie Smith, 
Alice Spruill, 
Margaret Stedman, 
Florence Thomas, 
Rosa Thomas, 
Mildred Tilton, 
Cantey Venahle, 
Mae Winslow, 
Amoret Wootten, 
Sadie Williams, 
Nora Zimmerman. 



HONORARY MEMBERS 



Miss Busbee, 
Miss Cheekley, 
Miss Dowd, 



Miss Fenner, 
Miss Jones, 
Miss Meade, 
Miss Newey, 
Miss Pixley, 



Miss Sutton, 
Miss Thurston, 

Miss Thomas. 



44 




45 



EPSILON ALPHA PI LITERARY SOCIETY 



MOTTO FLOWER 



Where high thoughts are duty, Wild Rose. 



COLORS 
Old Rose ami Sage. 



Advent Term. 
AriiisTA Porcher Junes. 
Cornelia Coleman, 
Ann Gifford, 
Carrie Helen Moore, 
Mary Sumter Thomas. 
Marie Stewart Phinizv 
Elise Gregory, 
Janie Brown, 
Hei.oise Beebe, 



OFFICERS 



President . 

1 'ift -I'i't sill/ itt 

Secretary . 
f 'or. Secretary 
Treasurer 
I V///V 

Historian . 
Teller 
Teller 



Easter Term. 
Augusta Porcher .Ionics. 
( 'oknei.ia Coleman. 
Marie .Stewart Phinizy. 
Carrie Helen Moore. 
Mary Sumter Thomas. 
Ann Kimberly Gifford. 
Helen Gladys Davies. 
Eliza Hamlin. 
Hei.oise Beebe. 



ROLL 



Heloise Beebe, 
Janie Brown, 
Mattie Chaffee, 
Annie Cheshire, 
Kena Clark, 
( 'ornelia Coleman, 
Ellen Dortch, 
Helen Davies, 
Harriet Davies, 



Isabel Gary, 
Elmer George, 
Ann Gifford, 
Caro Gray, 
Daisy Green, 
Elise Gregory, 
Eliza Hamlin. 
Minna Hampton, 



Julia Harris, 
Mary Harrison. 
Kate Herndon, 
Clifford Heyward, 

Augusta Jones. 
Agnes Makely, 
Carrie Moore. 
Marie Phinizv. 



Julia Ilaughton. Annie Root. 



Isabel Ruff, 
Mary Sturgeon, 
Mary S. Thomas. 
Bessie Trapier, 
Sarah Tyler, 
Leize Weaver, 
Evelyn Weeks, 
Marie Williams. 
Susie Wood. 



Dr. Bratton, 
Mrs. Bratton, 
Miss Melvimmon, 



HONORARY MEMBERS 

Mrs. Quinby, Mrs. Randolph, 

Miss Walton, Miss Hull. 

Mile. Gerber, Miss Pee, 

Miss Trapier. 



Miss Jones. 
Miss Boyd, 
Miss Pitteuger, 



46 



A SKETCH OF THE EPSILON ALPHA PI 
LITERARY SOCIETY 



EARLY IN the fall the Sigma Lambda Literary .Society entertained the 
Epsilon Alpha Pi Society with a reception in " The Far Countree." 
Dark green pine boughs and clusters of brilliant golden-rod were the 
chief decorations, helped out, of course, by the omnipresent sofa pillow. 
The pines not only looked beautiful, but they also filled the room with the fra- 
grance of the woods. After a feast of ice cream and cake, the Epsilon Alpha 
Pi's reluctantly departed, having spent a most enjoyable evening. 

On the evening of October 30, the Epsilon Alpha Pi Society gave a 
reception to the Sigma Lambda Society. The old parlor was transformed by 
rugs, palms and bowls of chrysanthemums, and music was rendered during 
the evening. The receiving committee was Augusta P. Jones, Ann K. Gifford 
and Cornelia Coleman. Refreshments of salad, sandwiches and coffee were 
served. 

The Epsilon Alpha Pi Literary Society holds a meeting every two weeks, 
at which there are readings and debates by the members ; every other meet- 
ing being open to the public. Some of the most interesting debates of the past 
year were : Resolved, "That tariff should be levied for revenue only," and, 
Resolved, " That trusts are beneficial to the United States." 

After a closed meeting of the Epsilon Alpha Pi Society on the evening of 
December 10, at which the new members were installed, the Society went 
over to the Rectory, where the new members were entertained with an informal 
reception. In the cozy little Rectory parlor every one was made to feel at 
home. Salad and chocolate were passed around. 



47 



THE LITERARY SOCIETIES A SKETCH 



AS [S the case with other scl Is, our societies have taken an important 
place in our school life, consuming much of our time and interest, 
though their period of activity has Itch brief. So we 'I" not think it 
out of place to give here a short history of them for the benefit of the 
Alumna? and all others who are interested in the growth and work of St 
Mary's. 

In the spring of 1900 the English classes were divided into two portions 
by Miss Stone, the English teacher, and this was the beginning of our presenl 
literary societies. There was quite an excitement at the time and despite 
Miss Stone's protestation that we were " literary societies," every one persisted 
in asking " Which side are you on?" Soon, however, the society names, the 
initial letters of the names of the two Southern poets. Sidney Lanier and 
Edgar Allan Poe, were decided upon, and then there were no longer "sides." 
but the "Sigma Lambda" and the " Epsilon Alpha Pi." But such an inno- 
vation as literary societies which had so suddenly been thrust upon us could 
not as suddenly grow into literary prominence. Then, too, there wrvr pins, 
colors, mottoes, etc., to be chosen. So it was not until the fall of 1901 that 
both societies were in good working order with regularly arranged programs. 
Many debates have been held and many questions settled by the debaters. In 
the inter-society debate of last year, the Sigma Lambdas proved that " Poetry 
bad done more for the development of man than prose." and carried off the 
palm. The success of the societies in the last two years, the steady improve- 
ment in essays and all the exercises, we owe largely to the presidents who have 
been unceasing and untiring in their efforts for the betterment of the societies. 
The societies have entered into the literary life at St. Mary's as nothing else 
could have done, and given it an interest and stimulus which otherwise 
would have been lacking, and the strong society spirit has caused that generous 
feeling of rivalry which gives tone and vitality to school life. Socially also, 
the societies have had their place. More than once one society has partaken 
of the hospitality of the other, and all will agree in saying that these diver- 
sions are not the least enjoyable features of the societies. 



48 



Secret Societies 




49 




ALPHA KAPPA 



Fi 'U IDED 19(H). 




ALPHA CHAP; 













3 '• ' 



Miss Tii 



SORORES IF tMIA 



. 1 Isl lin IfclJCllV ! ' 

hhI Lu rayloi 
liobi ■ 

hi ill m 

1 . > . i i ■ ■ ( i r;i i 
Wins! - > 



I .■ 



Saint Mary's School Library 




L- 








ALPHA KAPPA PSI 







FOUNDED 1900 










ALPHA 


CHAPTER 






FLOWER 












COLORS 


'orget-me-not 










i; 


live and < iol 




SORORES 


IN 


FACULTATE 






M 


iss Chbckl 


KY, 




Miss 


Thom \ 






SORORES 


IN 


ACADEMIA 






Bo wen, J 


osephiiie, 






Means, Ksllu 


:r Barnwell, 


Burgwyn 


, Minnie, 






Redwood, Lucy Ta\ 


dor, 


('lark, M 


ae Lillian, 






Robertson, 1 


[allie 1 


Sremond, 


( loleoian, 


Cornelia, 






Short, Mary 


Allan, 




I )u Hose, 


Margaret, 






Sti'ilinan. Ml 


irgaret 


Gray, 


Hubard, 


Pocahontas 


Boiling, 




Winslow, Mi 


w VV 


1, 



Wood, Susie. 

5t 



Saint Mary's School Library 




5 2 




GAMMA BETA SIGMA 



FLOWER 

Violet, 



COLORS 

Purple and ( io' 



ROLL 



Rosalie Bernhardt, 
Caroline Mays Brevard, 
Margaret Bridgers, 
Isabel Asliljy Brumby, 



Julia Boardman [-Iaugliton 
Mary Ferrand Henderson, 
Mary Kolton Hunter, 
Florence Jackson Thomas, 



Cantey McDowell Venable. 




~ Ybj 0>m ?- fe— ft 9*r . 

-=>, Hum. thlvnw-., 01 \ 













'"TW ©^ 



3-1 



The German Clubs 




< i ( 



55 







£ 



^? 






i? 






G c 5r 

cccccc 
c 



56 



TAU DELTA GERMAN CLUB 



COLORS 



( (ray and < ioli 



OFFICERS 



Octavia Winder Hughes, 
Mary Bulling Sturgeon, 
Marie Stewart Phinizy, 
Mary Ferrand Henderson, 
Isabel Ashby Brumby, 



President. 

Vice-President. 

Leader. 

Secretary. 

Treasurer. 



ROLL 



Minnie Beebe, 
Rosalie Bernhardt, 
•Josephine Bowen, 
Margaret Bridgers, 
Norcott Broadfoot, 
Hellen Brock, 
Katharine Brock. 
Isabel Brumby, 
Mattie Chaffee, 
Lillian Clark, 
Margaret Connor, 
Pearl Fort, 
Elmer George, 
Virgilia Glazebrook 



Mary Gramling, 
Mary Henderson, 
Emily Hodges, 
( >ctavia Hughes, 
Mary Meares, 
Dora McRae, 
Jennie Murehison, 
Marie Phinizy, 
Mary Robinson, 
Mary Sturgeon, 
Mildred Tilton, 
( !antey Venable, 
Leize Weaver, 
Evelyn Weeks, 



Carrie Williams 



57 



58 



;erman 






: H<JAB 

Livv 1 



ROLL 









Hi 




' 


rill 


1 ; 




1 








1 - 


: 








" 





■: :i - 
'■: 

rtsli 
: . moil 

. 

Will . Iiorl 

( i (.' 1 ' I ] 

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1 : , ■• : . 

I o re 1 1 ci Tim, 

lll'l I llOIlli 
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: - 









L'ETOILE GERMAN CLUB 



OFFICERS 



Margaret Gray Stedjian, 
Lucy Taylor Redwood, . 
Ann Kimberly Gifford, . 
Augusta Porcher Jones, . 
Julia Boardmah Hauouton, 



. President. 

Sir fil 11 rij. 

TfritHiirir. 

Leuder-in-Chie". 

Asxistiinl Lender. 



ROLL 



( iretchen Barnes, 
Caroline Brevard, 
Minnie Burgwyn, 
Cornelia ( 'oleman, 
Elba Cotten, 
Florence Cowles, 
Helen Davies, 
Harriet Davies, 
Ann ( iifford, 
Julia Haughton, 
Boiling Hubard, 
Augusta Jones, 
Agnes Mukelv. 



Esther Means, 
K:i( harine Meares, 
( 'anie .Moure 
Annie Nash, 
Lucy Redwood, 
Mallie Robertson, 
Mary Short, 
( iertrude Sullivan, 
Margaret Stedman, 
Lucy Tayloe, 
Florence Thomas, 
Sumter Thomas, 
Mae Wiuslow. 



59 




6o 



DRAMATIC CLUB 



OFFICERS 



Marie Stewart Phinizy, 
Augusta Porcher Jones, 
Ann Kimbekly Gifeord, 



President. 

I ice-President. 

Secretary and Treasurer. 



EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 
Mary Ferrand PIenderson, Leizk Holmes Weaver 



Minnie Burgwyn, 
Julia Haughton, 
Octavia Hughes, 
Isabel Ruff, 



ROLL 



Mary Sturgeon, 
Mary Thomas, 
Mildred Tilton, 
Eloise Zimmerman. 



61 




SKETCH CLUB 



Miss Fknner, 

JOSEI'HINE BOWEN, 
M.\KV G HAVES, 



OFFICERS 



President. 
Tn isnri r. 



NOLL 



Heloiso Beebe, 
Josephine Bowen, 
Lillian Clark, 
Mary Dixon, 
Priscilla Dodson, 
Emmie Drewry, 
Pearl Fort. 
Mary Graves, 



Nannie Ilav. 
( 'arrie Hughes, 
( 'aniline Jones, 
Marie Poinier, 
Mary Robinson, 
Mary Allan Short, 
Nannie Smith, 
Cantev Veuable, 



Susie W'uml. 



HONORARY MHMBERS 



Miss Fenner, 



Miss M. M. Jones. 



62 



THE WAYS OF THE ART BABES 



' Cantev, you may draw Augustus 0;csar next." 

Which is she. Miss Fenner?" asked Cantev, quite vexed 
' Priscilla, why do yon look ai your Clyte so sad? 

It's really improved, or at least — not half bad." 
• When can I do Gibsons?" petite Nannie inquires, 

But she must do Docks ere to those she aspires. 
'My beautiful oranges, Miss Fenner, will spoil," 

Mourns Beebe, while doing her first group in oil. 

■ We don't know our lesson, haven't looked atihe chart." 
Groans the laziest class in the History of Art. 

From September till June all of this good time spent, 
They know nothing but Lysicrates and his monument. 
'Mary Dixon, what do you think you are doing'.'" 
'Nothing.'' the fair critic answers, her curl gently screwing. 

■ Is Miss Kenner in a good humor this morning ?" 
We ask on the steps. If she's not we take warning. 
We hardly dare breathe when she's on the war-path, 
For it's not a choice thing to rouse up her wrath. 
To go near her table is a thing we don't dare. 

For "pea green and sky blue lights" come in her hair. 

Miss Fenner says Thursdays are her busy days. 

As she sits in the sun. and at nature does gaze. 

Little Robinson asks questions the whole live-long day 

As to why do you do il '.' and what'' and which way???? 

Our silent, mechanical Virginia Bland 

Draws houses and churches and chimneys quite grand. 

Versatile Annie, our painter so rare. 

Puts paint on her apron, likewise on her hair. 

In life class Leize Weaver is apt to be head: 

Allan's is strong, Lillian's appears to be dead. 

Mary Graves got zero on History of Art, 

But she signed the pledge — which was good on her part. 

The rest are all choice, but we have not the time 

To hunt up the words with their names to rhyme. 

63 




(.. ^Ufiz 



64 



$ 







OF 



•if 




c 



A.'&HlxE^ICS 







6S 



THERE WAS A TIME 



Where arc the Sigma's and Mu's this year'.' 

Where is the victory cry ? 
Where arc the white and blue banners 

Waved by the crowd on high? 

What was the score of the match game? 

Who made the fatal play, 
And gave to the opposite side 
All the glories of the day '.' 

Show me the girl with the rosy cheeks, 

Enjoying health and life, 
Her eyes bright with excitement, 

Her heart happy and light. 

The basket-ball field is deserted now, 
No sport we have had this season ; 

No contention between the Sigma's and Mu's, 
"And why" you ask, " is the reason'.'" 

Because we have quiet and dignified girls, 

Ladies shouldn't race and tear, 
But take a book under a shady tree. 

And there enjoy the fresh air. 



-I. B., '04. 



66 



A THING OF THE PAST 



The tennis-rackets are old and battered, 
As idle they hang on the wall ; 

The tennis-net is torn and tattered, 
And what has become of the ball? 

Time was when the tennis-nets were new, 
And the courts were passing fair, 

And that was the time when athletes true 
Played their tournaments there. 

But lessons are many and lessons arc lorn. 

And we've many of them, vui know, 
And that is the reason our tennis games 

Are a thing of the long ago. 



— F. T., '03. 



A WORN-OUT FAD 



What's become of the Wheel Society? 
Why, all last year with great sobriety, 
Directors, teachers, uirls. would rally. 
And from the grove in hoards would sally. 

In the country and in the town, 
With limks elate would vide around, 
At morn, at noon, and e'en at night, 
Would wheel about, if the moon were bright. 

So, of a maiden I inquired 
If of their wheels they all had tired? 
She gave nie an indulgent smile, 
■ ( >h, bicycles, vou know, are out of style." 



oS 



UNANIMOUSLY AWARDED 



Why is the St. Mary's girl so tall and tan? 
Why does she look so strong and stride like a man ? 
Because an hour on each sunny day 
Out in the grove does she leisurely stray. 

Up and down our sunny grounds 

She slowly makes the daily rounds. 

If there was a walking prize she'd surely win it, 

For she takes at least two steps a minute. 

— M. (_i., '05. 



69 




7° 



MISSIONARY ORGANIZATIONS 



ST. MARY'S BRANCH WOMAN'S AUXILIARY 

Miss Walton, .......... President. 

Miss Sutton, ........ I 'fee-President. 

Miss McKuuroN, ....... Secretary and Treasurer. 



ST. MARY'S BRANCH JUNIOR AUXILIARY 

ST. CATHERINE'S CHAPTER 

Miss Alice Edwards Jones, ...... Directress. 

Florence Thomas, ........ President. 

Caro Brevard, ......... Secretary. 

Lucy Redwood, ......... Treasurer. 

ST. ETHELDREDA'S CHAPTER 

Mrs. Bratton, ......... Directress. 

Elmer George, President. 

Ootavia Hughes, ......... Treasurer. 

Mary Allan Short, ........ Secretary. 

ST. MARGARET'S CHAPTER 

Miss Checklky, ... . . . . . . Directress. 

Alice Winston Spruill, President. 

Caroline Mott Cowles, Secretary. 

Mary Gramling, ......... Treasurei: 



ST. MONICA'S CHAPTER 



Miss McKimmon, 
Mary deBkrniere Graves 
Marjorie Hughson, 
Gertrude Sullivan, 



Directress. 
PresidU ni. 
Treasurer. 
Secretary. 



ST. ANNE'S CHAPTER 



Miss Sutton, 
Sadie Jenkins, 
Mary Payne, 
Sadie Williams, 
Lucy Tayloe, 



Directress. 
President. 
Secretary. 
Treasun r. 
istant Treasurer. 



ST. ELIZABETH'S CHAPTER 



Miss Thomas, 
Mary Hunter, 
Isabel Brumby, 
Cornelia Coleman, 
Maky Exum Meares, 



Directress. 
President. 

-I'nsiili nl. 

Secretary. 
Treasun r. 



ALTAR GUILD 



Miss McKimmon, 
Florence Thomas, 



Supt rintt rtdt nt. 
President. 



Ihi flftemortam 



Jflorence £ucfter 38o\>lan 

ENTERED INTO REST FEBRUARY 4, 1903 

" When little Florence came to us, scarce a score of years ago, unto the 
earth a joy was born, into our lives a blessing fell. The radiant, uplifting, 
ennobling blessing of a spirit pure, and brave, by the light of whose beautiful 
faith our eyes were taught to see not the trouble and pain and grief of earth, 
but its beauty, its joy, its worthiness of the best that is in us all. 

"Around the young life clustered many lives tired and world-weary, and 
unto them all she brought a message of good cheer. One looked into those 
wonderful gray eyes and felt she understood. Another, sad with the sorrows 
of others, caught an echo from her laughing little mouth, and the dark places 
were made bright. 

" Her heart was full of kindness and help for all. ' She was the friend of 
all the world.' She understood. Your joy wanted its crown without the 
music of her laugh, the flash of her ready wit, and into your sorrow she came 
' like sunshine in a shady place.' " 



73 



jdBfe 




DANTE GABRIEL ROSSETTI-A SKETCH 



IN THE works of Dante Gabriel Rossetti, there is mingled with the sincerity 
and freshness of his English l>l<»>d the warmth and imagination of his 
Italian nature. Both his poetry and his art arc characterized by a love 

of the beautiful rather than by any striving after high ideals, and they are 
endowed with a personality and individuality that are irresistible. Men are 
fascinated by what they cannot understand and the subtle mystery in all of 
Rossetti's productions is one of their chief charms. 

His poems deal with two classes of subjects: those that treat of the super- 
natural and those that depict human character. Probably his best poem in 
the first style is " Eden Bower " It has for its theme what quite a large nura- 
ber of his poems have — the revenge of a deserted woman. The story is laid 
in the Garden of Eden, and Lilith, Adam's first wife, who has been deserted 
for Eve, plots her revenge. Her jealousy and hatred are intense, and know- 
ing that God has denied to man the fruit of the forbidden tree, she beguiles 
the serpent into giving her his form that she may tempt Eve to eat. Where 
she thinks of her future triumph, her wild delight is frightful as she gloats 
over the fall of man. 

In entire contrast to this is " A East Confession." It is in form a dramatic 
monologue, and represents a young man. on his death bed, confessing to his 
priest the murder of the girl whom he loved. He can not bring himself to 
tell of the deed but rambles on about some happy incident of their lives, or 
some sweet recollection of her childhood. Finally he tells that when he went 
to say farewell to her, he gave her a little ivory-handled knife to keep as a gift 
from one who loved her. But she scorned it and 

" Her eyes looked on (him) with emptied heart 
When most (his) heart was full of her." 

Utterly maddened he plunged the dagger in her heart. Ashe tells of this 
to the priest, he exclaims as though the thought had just come to him. 

'■ And she keeps it. see, 
l>n you not See she keeps it'.' — there, beneath 
Wet lingers and wet tresses, in her heart." 

76 



Rossetti shows himself to be a master where he portrays the young man's 
inability to confess his guilt. The agony of mind and the desolate remorse 
depicted are wonderfully human. 

Rossetti was extremely sensitive to sound and to color. Thus, of the 
"Blessed Damozel," he said : 

" Her voice was like the voice stars 
Had when they sang together." 

And he gives this delicious little description of the music of the Beryl stone : 

" they too were 'ware 
( )f music — notes that fell through the air ; 
A chiming shower of strange device, 
Drop, echoing drop, once, twice and thrice, 
As rain may fall in Paradise." 
Nor less exquisite is the appearance of the Beryl stone : 

■■ With shuddering light 'twas stirred and strewn 
Like the cloud-nest of the wading moon : 
Freaked it was as the bubble's ball, 
Rainbow-hued through a misty pall, 
Like the middle light of the waterfall." 

As his art manifested itself in his poetry in wonderful coloring and beauti- 
ful description, so his poetry influenced his art in giving poetic conceptions. 
These two talents were a mutual strength, and the characteristics of one are 
observed in the other. In his pictures the same truth to nature and original- 
ity appear as well as the same brilliancy of color, mystery and symbolism. 
His types of women, too, are the same. They all have abundance of golden 
hair, as the Blessed Damozel, whose "hair that lay along her back was yellow 
like ripe corn." Their faces are grave and thoughtful, with full tender lips 
and in their eyes unfathomable mystery. Rossetti particularly admired "large 
lovely arms and a neck like a tower." Even though he sometimes exag- 
gerated this feature of large hands and arms, they are a great relief after the 
tiny-handed heroines so popular in modern art and fiction. But his women 
are strong creatures, with nothing coy nor affected about them. 

After this slight study of his poems and pictures, can we not fancy the 
man? Bright, fresh, impetuous, irresistible. One of those open-hearted, 
open-handed natures that attracts every one. And yet Rossetti was rather 
undemonstrative and reserved ; except toward his mother, and her he fondled 
and [ictted with gentle tenderness. He was always on the alert to find things 
that would interest her, and would treasure up little incidents about the birds 

77 



and the animals, the dowers and the woods for her entertainment. For his 
wife he attested his affection by, on her death, burying with her his volume 
of poems just ready for publication. The romance of this story is. however, 
somewhat diminished by our knowledge that he afterwards permitted them 
to be exhumed and published. 

One man differs from another in only a few distinguishing features, and 
one of these in Rossetti was the mania for collecting odd things. One day, 
in a lit of enthusiasm, he boughl a zebu, very beautiful I >> 1 1 very ferocious. 
As the only place to keep his acquisition was the back yard, and the only 
way to reach the back yard was through the house, the zebu was escorted 
through the hall into his future home. Here Rossetti feasted his eyes and 
exulted in his new possession — from the back dour. When finally he made 
bold to approach his little pet to caress his downy coat, he was soon made 
aware that his presence was not desired, and only after vigorous exertion did 
lie escape with his life. Next day the zebu was duly conducted out of the 
front door, but Rossetti was always reticent about talking of his zebu. An- 
other idiosyncrasy of this whimsical man was the accumulating of blue china 
His collection was beautiful and valuable, but he was obliged to sell it to 
meet his expenses. 

In appearance the poet-painter was of Italian type, with dark complexion. 
dark silky hair and bluish-grey eyes. Mis beard and moustache were slightly 
auburn, and this seems to have been a family characteristic, as the name Ros- 
setti means a tendency towards red hair. 

Rossetti's most lasting influence springs from his struggle with the Pre- 
Raphaelite brothers to portray truth. They painted nature directly from 
herself, and not second-hand from Raphael or any previous artist. In liter- 
ature they expressed the same ideal. The brotherhood, having been organ- 
ized chiefly by Rossetti, and centered around him as its dominant spirit, 
passed away after his death. Km even though it no longer exists, its inthi- 
ence is still inspiring men to represent nature as ii is. A. G. R.. '03. 



7^ 



SOME WOMEN OF BROWNING. 



SIR LESLIE STEPHEN says of Roberl Browning thai "whatever else he 
was, he was essentially a psychologist." In his poetry, all else is subser- 
vient to one thing — the study of human nature. His power and, above 
all, subtlety in the analysis of human character is by no other feature 
of his poetry so strongly and fascinatingly exemplified as in his portrayal 
of types of womanhood. 

In all his galaxy of women. Browning has given us a no more artistic and 
individual personality than that of the little Italian silk-winder. Pippa. The 
choice of her nationality is the first obvious example of the poet's surface skill 
which presents itself to our thought. She combines the childish innocence of 
her years with the early-developing maturity of the Southern woman. In 
the dramatic motive of the poem she typifies unconscious goodness. (Jncon- 
scious her goodness is, but it is not the goodness of ignorance, nor yet of a 
childish innocence; she lias, if only with the instinctive recognition of pure 
womanhood, a knowledge of good and evil. She thinks Ottinia and Sebald 
happy in the intensity of their mutual love because, in accordance with her 
nature, she thinks the love good and pure. Bill she lias sonic inkling of the 
scandal attached and realizes, further, that, it' this be so, true happiness — the 
happiness of Goodness ami Purity — is not existent therein. The austerity of 
Pippa's life has taught her more than one lesson of worldly lore, and when 
she passes Jules and Phene she muses, with a wisdom which has been criti- 
cized as beyond her years, on the fact that 

"Lovers grow cold, men learn to hate their wives." 

She expresses a preference for the calmer, careful love of parenthood, and from 
that she passes on to her choice of the love of the priest, Monsignor. This is 
the triumph other typitication of Goodness — the choice of Divine Love 

In this poem of " Pippa Passes," the character of ( Hthna stands out in bold 
relief On the one hand, this is effected by the clear light of Pippa's goodness 
in contrast with the other woman's passion and evil ; on the other baud, by 
the indecision and alertness of the German man as opposed to the absorption 

79 



and intensity of the Italian woman. In the intensity of her nature, she finds 
entire satisfaction in the gratification of her passion ; she loves Scbald the 
more on account, of the crime. Her ultimate remorse is brought about, not 
through the influence of awakening good, but because she loses the love of 
Sebald. Hers is the character analysis of one of the most elementary types of 
womanhood — passionate, intense in every emotion, untaught by reason, un- 
governed by self-control and unawakened to a perception of the Good. 

In Phene, also, there exists for us a distinct personality which is empha- 
sized by the characters of the other two women. She has not the innate purity 
of Pippa's childishness, nor yet the passion of Ottima's more developed wo- 
manhood. Brought into contact with the goodness of Jule's nature, her own 
responds. It is interesting to note the influence of her awakening womanhood 
upon the man. 

Of Colombe, it has been said that she is one of Browning's "sweetest find 
piost complete" characters. One of tin.' sweetest, because we realize that it is 
through charm of personality that she gives the impression of noble woman- 
hood ; one of the most complete, because the development other character is 
traced step by step in the poem until her perfected womanhood is revealed on 
the birthday other real self and her real life. When first confronted with the 
loss of her duchy she reveals by her action that, woman-like, personal support 
and devotion have been of more importance to her than the duties and re- 
sponsibilities of her position. Yet the fineness of her nature is shown at once 
by her response to the pleading of Valence. The first important step in her 
development is accomplished when Valence succeeds in making her realize 
that she has been taking too personal a view of her position, and awakens her 
to the duties imposed upon her by it. After reading the paper which is pre- 
sented her by Valence, she says at once. 

'■Prince Berthold, who art -Tuber's Duke it seems — 
The King's choice, and the Emperor's, and the Tope's — 
Be mine, too! Take this people! Tell not me 
Of rescripts, precedents, authorities. 
But take them, from a heart that yearns to give ! ' 
Find out their love, — I could not ; find their fear. — 
I would not : find their like, — 1 never shall. 
Among tin' flowers ! Colombe of Ravestein, 
Thanks God she is no lunger Duchess here!" 

But after Valence's impassioned appeal for f'leves and her sovereignty, 
she exclaims, with a nobility of impulse and a quickness of perception, 

So 



"Then 1 re- 
main Cleve's Duchess! Take your note, 
While Cleves but yields one subject of this stamp, 
I stand her lady until she waves me nil! 
For her sake, all the Prince claims I withhold ; 
Laugh at each menace ; and, his power defying, 
Return his missive with its due contempt !" 

Thus we see her quick response to his nobler ideal of her position. Yet, 
when she comes into the presence of Berthold and is on the point of yielding, 
t is the thought of her loss of power that determines her to make a stand 
against him, 

" Oh, my very heart is sick, 
It is the daughter of a line of Dukes 
This scornful, insolent adventurer 
Will bid depart from my dead father's walls!" 

But she shows development and awakening of character in the same 
scene, for while she is hesitating to contend with Berthold, she says to Valence, 

" Now, sadly conscious my real power was missed, 
Its shadow goes without so much regret ; 
Else could I. not again thus calmly bid you 
Answer Prince Berthold." 

She remains more interested in others' fulfilling their duty to her than in 
the fulfilling of her duties towards others. To the end she constitutes herself 
the judge of others. In the scene with Valence she encourages him to make 
a declaration of his love in order to reassure herself and, for she is ever femi- 
nine, to satisfy her vanity, and, at its close 1 , although she returns his love, she 
exclaims in pain when she realizes that his motive showed not the "broader, 
finer service" — that of loyalty. Interpretation here admits of two or more 
conflicting conclusions. Either she is really pained to discover that the per- 
sonal equation existed in Valence's motive, or, realizing that such a nature as 
Valence's would have performed the duty to Cleves whether or no, she sees 
that the love is independent of any service which it may render, and, too, that 
the duty is not necessarily marred by personal interest. If the latter he the 
true interpretation, then her exclamation, 

"Mournful — that nothing's what it calls itself! 
Devotion, zeal, faith, loyalty — mere love," 

is merely a happy triumphant thrust at what she knows is supreme. Thus 



the latter is probably 1 1 1 < ■ deeper, and, in view of Browning's habitual exalta- 
tion of love, the truer interpretation. Ii may be said of Colombe in general 
that, although she herself fails to grasp the trues! meanings and to choose the 
highest ideals, yet when these arc shown her through the agency of another, 
her womanhood is quick to grasp the truest ami to choose the highest. In- 
tellectually, she is not developed sufficiently to take the initiative, but she ha- 
il woman's subtlety of perception and quickness of response. These qualities 
joined with an eminently feminine charm of personality lead us to judge that 
Browning intended her to be the impersonation of a popular ideal of a 
woman's nature. 

In this intense womanliness and subtle femininity of disposition, < 'onstanee. 
the character of chief interest in "In a Balcony," is not unlike Colombe. In 
this poem the man and the woman are ideal foils the one for the other. Asa 
man, he is upright, honest, direct — and SO a manly man : as a woman, she is 
perceptive, loving, protective — and so a womanly woman. Norbert loves 
Constance, he is grateful to the Queen, ami his man's nature prompts him to 
proclaim his love and to plead his cause. Constance loves Norbert, and she. 
too, is grateful to the Queen. But she is more than grateful and her woman's 
nature prompts her to delay, to plan, to follow some less direct measure. Not 
that she is morally weak, hut she is true to a woman's more subtle instincts of 
perception and affection. Late]-, when confronted by the alternative of the 
Queen's anguish, she proves her love and gratitude capable of the supremest 
self-sacrifice. The entire poem is the exemplification of a man's acceptation 
of the first, most obvious duty, and a woman's blind ferreting out of an under- 
lying, more elusive and more self-torturing one. Constance is not intended to 
be the impersonation of an unquestioning, evenly moral nature, but the lov- 
ing, sensitive delineation of a most womanly one. Critics are divided con- 
cerning Constance, striving to prove her either utterly good or utterly bad. 
But no such arbitrary decision can be reached: she is too consistently and 
elusively feminine. 

As to the Queen, she is an example of an artificial, starved nature, which 
must have once been an intensely womanly one. She craved the support and 
protection of love and found no solace in the ruling of men. She was capable 
of a self-denial rivalling Constance's own, but she could not brook the pity 
and triumph of the younger woman. She is at the same time pathetic and 
terrible. 

Polyxena, in "King Victor and King Charles." is from first to last the 
quick-witted, decisive woman, move fit. perhaps, in the spirit of discernment 
and decision, to rule than King ( 'harles himself is. She exerts a strong inliu- 



ence over him, succeeds in [(ringing him to the height of her point of view 
and then is incapable herself of following him in his further development. 
Her practicality and clear-headedness influence him strongly and make of 
her "the power behind the throne." She makes mistakes such as are consist- 
ent with her character; her powers of penetration are not always perfect, she 
does not at first see through Victor's intention and she continues to the last to 
suspect D'Ormea (if plotting against Charles. She is clear-headed, practical 
and truth-loving; he is weaker, less stable ami less discerning, but with more 
ideality of disposition, and, once aroused by contact with her strength, is 
capable of a higher, more sensitive development. 

In Anael, devotion to her tribe is almost a religion and she bestows a 
divine, exalted love upon the man who, as she thinks, is to be its saviour. Her 
scorn, when he makes his confession, is intense, as is consistent with her nature, 
but it is momentary. A more human love bred of her woman's heart awakes 
to its part of loving, cherishing. and protecting; so that Djabal says to her: 
" It seemed hive, but it was not love : 

How could 1 love while thou adored me? 

Now thou dispisest, art above me so immeasurably !" 

She exemplifies the relation between a love that is divine in its remoteness 
and exaltation and a love more human in its very weakness, and she becomes 
for us a Revelation of the Incarnation. 

Pompilia is acknowledged to be the masterpiece of Browning's creation ; 
if only from the fact that so many points of view of her as a woman are pre- 
sented. Yet with so many and so different personages telling the story in 
"The Ring and the Book," we get the same impression of her salient charac- 
teristics. Thus she gains strength of individuality by having her story told 
and retold. If the poet had failed, this method would have made of her a 
product of conflicting and inconsistent characteristics, and her impersonation 
as a distinct individual would have been lost to us. In her purity and inno- 
cence she is not unlike Pippa, but she is far more intense and human in her 
emotions. When, at the end, she does come to love Caponsaccbi, it is with a 
a pure, unquestioning love. She thinks that, as a priest, he would not marry 
her if he could, and she does not conceive of the possibility of her marrying 
him. The purity of her thought is shown by her allusion here to "the marry- 
ing and giving in marriage in Heaven." She experiences, too, the intensity of 
the purest and most self-sacrificing of all lovi — that of motherhood. This 
purifies her every other feeling of love. 

A study of woman in the poetry of Browning calls forth, first, a comment 
on his deep knowledge of human nature and, secondly, his powers in the crea- 

83 



tion of personalities. lie is noi confined to typical or racial characteristics, 
although, with the master-artist's skill, he bends these outside influences to 
his use. Anael is not the typical Oriental woman; she has tar too much in- 
tellectual and emotional energy. Yet tin' contrasting racial characteristics of 
Sebald and Ottima are skillfully used in the depicting of their contrasting in- 
fluences upon each other. Throughout his poems his characters acl strongly 
upon each other, and he dwells upon and emphasizes the power of woman's 
influence. Further, his characters are created by the subtlest analysis of their 
thoughts and actions, and not by descriptive sketches. But the latter, when 
used, are effective and comprehensive. When he puts into the mouth of tie 
huntsman telling the story the following inimitable description of the Duchess: 

"She was active, stirring, all lire. 
Could not rest, could not tire, 

To a stone she might have given life. 

* * * # 

The smallest lady alive * 

Too small, almost, for the life and gladness 

That over-filled her," 

it leaves little to be added to our picture either of her appearance or charac- 
ter-qualities. 

Each of his women exists as an individual ; this notwithstanding the fact 
that he invariably has in view the exemplification and exaltation of certain 
great ideals. His poetry is permeated with his conception of the nobility of 
self-sacrifice, the loftiness and magnitude of human love, and the exaltation 
and perfection of divine love. Thus through the medium of womanhood, 
creating at the same time strong and intensely human individualities, he has 
taught the great lessons of his poetry. K. de R. M.. '03. 



84 



THREE POETS OF THE SOUTH-LANIER, HAYNE 
AND T1MROD 



Lanier. 



SELDOM ARE the names of three poets so closely connected as are those 
of Lanier, Hajme and Timrod. And it is well that it is so. The men 
themselves were natives of sister States, were fellow-members of the 
Confederate army, and wrote poetry pervaded by the same high and 
noble spirit. Their popularity, however, stands on different planes. 

Of the three, Sidney Lanier is the most widely known. He was born in 
Macon, Georgia, February 3, 1S42. The Laniers were of French Huguenot 
blood. The poet's maternal ancestors attained distinction in music and paint- 
ing at the court of Elizabeth and the Stuarts ; for his mother was of Scotch 
descent. On both sides, therefore, he was descended from pious ancestors, and 
it may not be too fanciful to suppose that he drew from those far-off art-loving 
Huguenot forerunners the beginning of his own exquisite sensibility. 

He early showed signs of this sensibility, music especially having a won- 
derful power over him. As a boy he could play almost any instrument, and 
it is recorded that after improvising on the violin, he would be rapt into an 
ecstasy which left his whole frame trembling with the exhaustion of too tense 
delight. 

His education was such as was to be obtained at a small Southern semi- 
nary before the Civil War. At fourteen he entered Oglethorpe College, where 
he was graduated with highest honors in 1860. At graduation he was elected 
a tutor in his alma mater, but before six months had passed he had entered 
upon his four years' university course in the awful school of war. Of him it 
might be said with truth : 

" His daily teachers had been wood and rills, 
The silence that is in the starry sky, 
The sleep that is among the lonely hills." 

He and his brother enlisted in the Macon volunteers and were hurried off 
to Virginia. He was engaged in many of the great battles of the war, and 

85 



although he enjoyed the wild, free life in the saddle and on the blockade, he 
never forgot his allegiance to poetry and music. He found time t" translate 
Heine, Goethe, and Schiller in camp, and after the arduous labors of the day 
were over, the magic notes of his flute, liis inseparable companion, could fre- 
quently be heard floating out on the night breezes. In 1864 he was captured. 
Pie endured great hardships during captivity, and the long journey he was 
forced to make in the dead of winter shattered his constitution and sowed the 
seeds of consumption. 

For ten years after the war he died various ways of winning bread: 
teaching in country schools, working in village stores, and practicing law with 
his father, each had its turn. But he was restless. He had not found his life- 
work ; he nourished his soul during these years of experiment only on sweel 
dreams and noble visions from which the twin figures, music and poetry, were 
never absent. With his marriage to Miss Mary Day, of Macon, in 1867, there 
came into his life the joy, the peace, the inspiration and the perfect love which 
the poet describes with deep feeling in the | m entitled "My Springs." 

Lanier was conscious of the possession of great power, but lack of congenial 
atmosphere hampered his development and the constant warfare he was wag- 
ing against consumption, gave him scant leisure for his art. From Texas 
whither lie had gone in search of health, he wrote to his wife: "All 
day my soul hath been cutting swiftly into the great space of the subtle, un- 
speakable deep, driven by wind after wind of heavenly melody. The very 
inner spirit and essence of all wind songs, bird songs, passion songs, soul songs, 
and body songs hath blown upon me in quick gusts like the breath of passion, 
and sailed me into a sea of vast dreams whereof each wave i> at once a vision 
and a melody." 

In 1873 he secured an engagement in Baltimore as first flute for the Pea- 
body Symphony Concerts. This step was of far-reaching influence on his 
future development: it meant a definite consecration of his life to music and 
poetry. 

He wrote to his father: "For twenty years, through poverty, through 
pain, through weariness, through sickness, through the uncongenial atmos- 
phere of a farcical college, and of a bare army, and then of an exacting busi- 
ness life, through all the discouragement of being wholly unacquainted with 
literary people and literary ways — these two figures of music and poetry have 
been steadily kept in my heart so that I could not banish them." The strug- 
gle for existence was not to become any easier, but now his hungry soul rev- 
eled in the atmosphere of music and poetry. He secured an appointment as 
lecturer on English Literature in Johns Hopkins University in 1ST!), and for 

86 



the first time in his life he was assured of a regular, though inadequate in- 
come. For two years he was able to maintain his superb straggle against 
tremendous odds, but the end came in September, 1881. Dr. Baskerville, in 
his appreciative study of the poet, says : "No mantle of charity had to be thrown 
over anything Sidney Lanier ever said or did. And it is pleasing to know 
that as he lay awake in the weary watches of the night beautiful thoughts and 
poetic fancies were his blessed companions." 

Sidney Lanier had a definite view of the relation of art to life. Life was 
not life if it allowed commercialism and materialism to put beyond its reach 
poetry and music and all the means of sesthetic and spiritual enjoyment. 
Lanier does not set forth these views didactically. His verse is too airy and 
refined to admit didacticism. So it is in form even more than in substance 
that his poems are gospels. "His 'Symphony' is not only a glorification of 
art ; it is itself a glorified example of art, in which the violins and the flute 
and the clarionet are made to speak almost in their own tones, complaining 
of the deadly blight of Trade, and ringing the praises of the music master, 
unselfish Love." 

Lanier sometimes let his worship of art destroy the spontaneity and 
naturalness of his work ; yet even granting this, we must look upon him as a 
poet largely trained by nature, for "true it is that a poet is made, not born, 
only the making is in the hands of God and of the poet himself." And in 
his poetry Ave see his pleasure in life, in the Hooding light and glowing color — 
his ecstasy, as it were, in the beauties of nature. He was thrilled by the 
glories of the sunrise just as his violin thrilled him, and he has put all of this 
nameless beauty and joy into his poetry. In "Corn," often considered his 
best work, the poet's 

" lieldward-faring eyes 
Take harvests where the stately corn ranks rise, 

Of inward dignities 
And large benignities and insights wise, 

Graces and modest majesties." 

Poems that are unsurpassed for glowing word-painting and appreciation 
of nature are the series of " Hymns of The Marshes," which comprise "Sunrise," 
"Individuality," and " Sunset;" these show his close communion with the great 
mother nature. 

He has, however, a wide range of feeling. All his poems do not show this 
wild sesthetic delight in life ; some are full of sadness, and he welcomes death 
as man's best friend. In " The Raven Days," there seems to appear a shadow 
of doubt, of dark distrust, but this is all dispelled in the glorious triumph of 

87 



"A Song of Eternity in Time," and also in a "Song of the Future," " The 
Ballad of the Trees and My Master" and "The Marshes of Glynn " are 

religion sot to music. 

His descriptions, his poetical perceptions are exquisitely vivid, yet equally 

delicate and fine. He himself said of one of his poems that it was not what 
he wished it to he because he could not find words to express the thought, lie 
had to put it into words of some sort to dress it to suit the popular fancy, hut 
by so doing the thought was marred; some day he would write one for 
himself, in which he would try to find words to express the beautiful thoughts 
in his soul. Those who have read his " Science of English Verse" and his 
" Music and Poetry " know how closely connected to his mind were music and 
poetry He sent a little poem to a friend once which he said " had snug itself 
through him," and he expressed it rightly. His poems give just thai im- 
pression ; they have "sung themselves through him," anil in the passage have 
gathered their beautiful thoughts from his rich poet nature. 

Sidney Lanier's poetical character may he summed up in the words from 
his own note-hook when he was in college, where we find him reflecting, "A 
poet is the mocking-bird of the spiritual universe. In him are collected all 
the individual songs of all individual nature ;" and lie was his own ideal. 

Hayne. 

Paul Hamilton Hayne was an intimate and dear friend of both Sidney 
Lanier and Henry Timrod, though particularly of the latter, for he was a 
friend of Timrod's boyhood. Hayne was born in Charleston. S. C. January 
1st, 1830. Inheriting the graces of his distinguished family, Paul Hayne 
possessed those qualities of mind and heart that we are accustomed to asso- 
ciate with the noblest types of the old South. He was a Southern gentleman 
to the core. 

He was educated at Charleston College, from which he was graduated. 
From earliest boyhood his fondness for literature, and particularly for poetry, 
was pronounced ; no sooner had he graduated than he threw himself actively 
into literary life. He became connected with. the journalism of his native city 
and was one of a group of enthusiastic young scholars who used to meet for 
literary suppers at the beautiful home of William Gilmore Sims. These sup- 
pers were brightened by the wit of Legare and the deep firm thought of Cal- 
houn and all the brilliant band who made Southern literature of that time 
worthy of praise. 

In the meantime, Hayne married Miss Mary Middleton Michel, of Char- 
leston. In the dark years that followed his wife was to him all that and 
more than Lanier's wife was to Lanier. By her self-renunciation, her exquisite 

88 



sympathy, her positive material help, her bright cheerfulness, she made endur- 
able the losses and trials that crowded Hayne's life. 

Although Hayne was a Colonel in the Confederate Army, and saw active 
service on the field of battle, his superb heroism was not fully tested until 
after the close of the war. In that awful conflict he lost health, home, books, 
property, everything except hope "and the consecration and the poet's 
dream." 

Out of the wreck, he came forth courageous and resolute, not to rebuild 
his shattered fortunes, but to live the life of an artist. He isolated himself in 
the pine barrens of Georgia and gave himself up to the profession of letters. 
There -at "Copse Hill," Georgia, nested among his greenery and his pines, the 
poet lived for the remainder of his life. Hamilton Mabie says, " The story 
of those fifteen years at Copse Hill, overlooking Augusta, and within the cir- 
cle of the whispering [lines, is one of those high traditions of the primacy of 
the spirit in which American history is exceptionally rich, and which, in the 
long reach of the centuries, may be seen to lie the fittest contribution made by 
the earlier American men of letters to higher civilization on this continent." 

It is as a writer of sonnets and of poems picturing Southern scenery that 
Hayne is noted. Artistic as he was in temperament, be has perhaps excelled 
other American poets in his use of the sonnet — that stanza with which so 
many great poets have unlocked their hearts. 

The recluse poet at "Copse Hill" interpreted nature, we think, with an 
insight not unlike that of the poet of Rydal Mount. He has made the melan- 
choly moanings of his Georgia pines sob through his verses. He has given 
voices to the "Midnight Thunder," to the "Windless Rain," to the "Musca- 
dines of the Southern Forests," to their "Woodland Phases," and to the 
"Aspects of the Pines." So Hayne, like Lanier, is a nature poet; yet while 
he is like him, he is different ; his songs are slower and nrore soothing, sad- 
der than Lanier's wild delight. In "The Poet's Trust in his Sorrow," we see 
the man himself, deprived as he was of all his worldly goods, telling us, 

" God ! how sad a doom is mine, 

To human seeming : 
Thou hast called on me to resign 
So much — much ! — all — but the divine 

Delights of dreaming." 

We find all through his poems the aromatic freshness of the woods, — the 
swaying insense of the cathedral-like aisles of pines, — the sough of dying sum- 
mer winds, — the glint of lonely pools, and the brooding notes of leaf-hidden 

s 9 



Blocking birds. A lover of the true and the beautiful, lie made bis verse the 
embodiment of the poetic spirit of the South. 

Henry Timbod. 

Less finished in his verse, but a more serious and spontaneous singer, was 
Hayne's friend, Henry Timrod. 

Tinirod was born at Charleston, S. C, December 8, 1820. Both his 
parents were cultured and talented, his father being himself no mean poet, but 
they were in straitened circumstances. They managed, however, to give their 
son an education ; he studied at the University of Georgia, where he was not 
graduated because of lack of means, but he distinguished himself in his college 
career. He was of a delicate, frail constitution, and early showed symptoms 
of that dread disease which brought his life to an untimely end. 

After he left college lie returned to Charleston, where he spent a short 
time in the delightful company of that charming and brilliant coterie of the 
quaint old city, William Gilmore Simms, George Bryan, and Timrod's dear 
and intimate friend, Paul Hayne. 

He next attempted the study of law, but his poet soul did not find this 
an agreeable occupation, and he secured a position as private tutor. It was 
during this period of quiet that he wrote some of his best works. This period 
was, however, not to last long. Already the storm was breaking on the poet 
and his people; the sun of the Confederacy was rising in blood: and now it 
was that Timrod wrote his stirring war lyrics which ring like steel on steel. 

Timrod, being of the hot blood of the South, responded to the call of his 
country, but after service in the arm}' for a short time, his disease grew on 
him to such an extent that he received an honorable discharge. This ina- 
bility to serve his country in the field was to him a source of great grief. 

In 18G4 he went to Columbia, S. G, where he became editor of the South 
Carolinian and strove to serve his country at home. Soon after his moving 
to Columbia, he married Miss Kate Goodwin, the "Katie" whose praises he 
has sung with so much tenderness and such loving grace. But the blow that 
ruined his prospects was the laying waste of Columbia by Sherman's army. 
His office, the office of the South Carolinian, was the first building destroyed 
on account of Timrod's vigorous and patriotic editorials which had made him 
obnoxious to the Federals; so obnoxious in fact that during their occupation 
of Columbia he was obliged to remain in biding. When he was able to come 
forth he found before him a picture of utter desolation : the once beautiful 
town a waste of ruins. He saw, too, the end of all his hopes and dreams of 
publishing a little volume of his poems — a volume that he fondly expected 

9° 



would make him known to the literary world. Sick unto death but with 
unfailing courage, he was obliged to labor on, literally, " to feed his family." 
He was too proud to receive willingly or graciously the help so gladly ten- 
dered by friends. 

Seven months later, Timrod's onty child, Willie, was laid in " that sweet 
grave " which, for no long time, was to part the father from his son ; for now 
Timrod's life was drawing to a close. The greatest trial of the many with 
which his life was filled — the death of this son — is indeed recorded in " Our 
Willie ;" but even here the poet's pride checks the expression of his bitter grief : 

"Shall we, shall you and I, before 
That world's unsympathetic eyes 
Lay other relics from our store 
Of tender memories '?" 

And even through this lament runs the deep note of a manly trust in God ; 
for a marked characteristic of the man was his unshaken trust. He never 
doubted, although his life was one long defeat. We find this characteristic of 
the man in his best and truest poems ; in them we find no false note, no 
jarring note of doubt, but many words of cheer — words that renewed the 
courage of his people, of the beloved, yet well-nigh despairing South. He 
reverently believed in the mission of the poet as prophet and teacher, and he 
consecrated bis gift to its noblest use, to the discharge of the " high and holy 
debt " that he, as poet, owed the world. It was largely for this reason that 
Timrod now clung to life. He felt that he had not finished his work, he had 
not discharged that "high and holy debt." For this reason and for the sake 
of those dear to him, he clung to life, but did not fear to die. He met his 
end with the same quiet courage with which he had lived. He died at Colum- 
bia, S. G, October 6th, 1867, and there, in the quiet graveyard of Trinity 
Church, he lies at rest. It is but a small shaft that marks the place 
where this hero lies, but it is good to know that " after life's fitful fever 
he sleeps well." 

As lover of man and nature his sympathy was universal ; no theme was 
too humble for his pen. " The same law that moulds a planet forms a drop 
of dew." " We can trace the mighty sun above even bj r the shadow of a 
slender flower." Yet he dealt not with the fleeting ; for the transitory was to 
him only the passing form of the abiding. He never wrote a line of merely 
descriptive poetry ; passionately fond as he was of Nature, and always inspired 
by her, Nature is only the symbol, the image used for interpreting a spir- 
itual meaning. 

The moral purity of his poems is their distinctive quality as it is of the 

91 



man ; with a universal sympathy for all life, he moved always oi the highest 
planes of thought and feeling and purpose. He seemed to be always im- 
pressed in his art with the truth of his own lines : 

"There is m> unimpressive spot on earth. 
The beauty of the stars is over all ;" 

and his earnestness and deep poetic insight clothed all themes with the beauty 
and light that is in and over all. 

"lie felt with Milton in his noble words that the abiding work is not 
raised in the heat of youth or by the vapors of wine, or by invocation to 
Dame Memory and her siren daughters, but by devout prayer to that Eternal 
Spirit who can enrich with all utterance and knowledge and send out his 
seraphim with the hallowed fire of his altars to touch and purify the lip~ of 
whom He pleases." 

In all his poems there is a nameless spell of simplicity, fervid yet tender, 
and an imagination strong yet delieate, both in its perception and in its 
expression. His style is " like noble music unto noble words ;" it is elaborate, 
yet perfectly natural: there is no trace of labor; grace 'guides and power 
impels. There is a ceaseless melody and perfect finish to his verse. Moreover, 
there is a universality of poetic feeling : he has struck every chord, and always 
with a keen sensibility and delicacy of natural instinct. 

Among his finest poems is "The Vision of Poesy," his longest work. It 
was written in his youth and sets forth the mission of the poetic art ; it has 
some lofty passages, and the promise of his later power and melody. 

"A Year's Courtship" is, in its glow and grace and music, the perfection 
of the poetic art; "A Serenade" is brimming with the luxuriousness of the 
South and is daintily voluptuous. 

" Ethnogenesis," "the birth of the nation," is regarded by some as his 
greatest poem ; it is a prophecy linked with an expression of the hope and 
aspiration of the newborn nation of the South. A permanent image of the 
Southern nature and character is thus richly portrayed. — 

But the type 
" Whereby we shall be known in every land 
Is that vast gulf which lips our Southern strand 
And through the cold, untempered ocean pours 
Its genial streams, that far off Arctic shores 
May sometimes catch upon the softened breeze 
Strange tropic warmth and hints of summer seas." 

"The Cotton Boll," with its thoughts of "the snow of Southern sum- 

92 



mers," is a forerunner of Lanier's " Corn ;" it is a vivid picture, a glowing- 
painting of Carolina from sea to mountain, and the poet tells us 

"No fairer land hath fired a poet's lays 
Or given home to man." 

" Spring," recalls the wonderful burst of a Southern spring, with its 
Hooding life and glory and beauty, the miracle of the old yet always divinely 
new story of the Resurrection. 

But his poetical works are not confined to the reflective ; his was at times 
a trumpet voice. When the blast of war sounded, his voice rang like a clarion 
in "Carolina" and "A Call to Arms." "Carolina" has all the fire of 
"Maryland! My Maryland," with a greater polish and a sort of restrained 
battle fury. These, with "Charleston," are the best poems that the War of 
Secession has produced, North or South. But " Charleston " is surely the best 
of all. For in drawing this picture of his beloved city facing her foes, Tim - 
rod has given us the living image of the South herself. When Timrod knows 
that troubles can be ended only by the stem arbitrament of war lie unflinch- 
ingly urges men to action ; but in many poems he lets appear his pathetic long- 
ing for an honorable peace, and this longing breaks forth in passionate desire 
and prayer in that noble poem, " Peace." 

" Timrod's poems are not the echo of any master, or the product of any 
school, but the full expression of his own nature, and therefore of more than 
his own, since his character was that of his people. For of all Southern 
writers Timrod is the most typical Southerner, and hence his verse most truly 
reflects the South; that South which is neither new nor old, but the South 
which, for storms or sunshine, changes as little as her own eternal hills." 

H. G. D., '03. 



93 



THE GRUMBLER'S LAMENT 



When I was born, 
Everyone cried ; 
I cried myself, 

Woo should betide ! 
All through my life 

Where'er I roam, 
Thorns strew my path 

Abroad or at home. 



My hair is too dark, 

My eyes are too light, 
My nose is too large, 

My mouth is not right. 
My clothes never fit, 

Each hat is a fright, 
My collars are loose, 

Mv shoes are too tight. 



I hated my home. 

They sent me to school, 
It's a thousand times vvoree, 

Each act has a rule. 
The teacher can't teach, 

There's nothing to eat. 
Except what's too salt 

Or else is too sweet. 

94 



Whenever I leave 

This hole of a place, 
I'll have to come out — 

Sad is my case. 
Parties I loathe, 

Dances I hate ; 
Each man's a bore, 

Oh ! what a fate ! 



I guess I shall live 

Until I shall die, 
It's a sad waste of time, 

For life is so dry. 
And when upward I mount, 

And on golden throne sit, 
My harp won't be tuned, 

And my halo won't fit. 



-E. R, '04. 






95 



A GOLDEN MEMORY 



HE WALKED quickly, impatiently, up and down the platform. The 
train was due in five minutes, but it seemed live hours to him. How 
he had waited for, and looked forward to this time ! It had been two 
years since he had seen her. "Yes," lie mused, '-two whole years, 
and it has seemed eternities to me." How time had lagged ! The months 
had dragged by so heavy and slow, with only five little letters from her in 
the meantime. Five precious little letters that he knew entirely by heart ; 
that he had read ami re-read until they were almost worn in two. And now — 
he would at last see her. He stopped to take a good breath, and recalled 
clearly how she had looked that day when he told her good-bye, her merciless 
little laugh when he had told her something, and asked her something. And 
even while he had recognized the heartlessness in her laugh, he had also 
caught the sweetness, which made it even harder for him, as he knew that the 
bitterness, only, was his. What a fool he had been even to hope a little! 
And now he was at last to know. She had promised to tell him this week. 

He heard the train as it blew in the distance, and wondered how he could 
be so calm when she was so near. "As it slowly drew up, he pushed through 
the bustling crowd, and caught sight of her. Her eyes were as blue — and 
there was the dear little dimple near her mouth, that always peeped out just 
before she smiled (how he loved that dimple !), her hair had the same soft, 
ashy gold look, anil there was just a tinge of color in her face. He noted all 
this in the little seeond it took him to reach her. " I'm glad, I'm glad," he 
said almost breathlessly. She laughed as she said. " I am too." He took her 
grip and umbrella in a way which showed how much he appreciated whose 
grip and umbrella it was, saying, " Mary couldn't come. She said I might 
bring you home." 

As he walked with her to the carriage he noticed that she held her head 
in the prowl little way he remembered so well, and that her chin had the same 
determined look. He wished, yes, he was sure he wished it did not look quite 
so determined. 

They talked of the various things that had come into each of their lives 
during the past two years. Then there was a pause. She looked straight 

96 



ahead as if she were looking down the visits of years, lie looked at her. 
Presently she turned her head, and glanced at him in the same half-serious, 
half-laughing way. 

" Well," he said, quietly, " do you remember?" 

She said quickly, as if she was trying to change the subject, 

"The little club we had when we were children, and the meanings we 
attached to certain colors?" 

" I remember," he answered, slowly, " that pink meant ' 1 love you ' and 
lavender ' yen.' " 

" I have a better memory than that," she said. " Green meant ' 1 hate 
you ;' blue, 'I'm your friend;' white, 'I care for you;' and black stood 
for ' no.' " 

"But this hasn't anything to do with my answer," he argued. 

"Oh yes it has! I will arrange it this way. You know there will be 
three dances this week. Well, }'ou ma}' get your answer from the colors of 
of the dresses I wear. The first dance is to-night. Be sure and watch for 
me," she said as he helped her out, "and don't forget the meanings of the 
colors." 

How could he wait four long hours to know even one-third of his answer ? 
But maybe it wouldn't be one-third. Maybe she would wear green. That 
looked so well (in her, and made her hair seem so full of gold. And 
then, if it should be black — how he hated black ! He remembered telling her 
once how he loved to see her in black : she looked like a subdued little nun. 
And he hated the thought of it now. 

He was at the dance an hour too soon, as he knew he would be He 
waited in misery, and talked nonsense until he heard her little, low laugh 
in the hall. As he looked toward the door he caught his breath in glad 
relief; she wore bhu — blue just the shade of her dear eyes. She was his 
friend at least. But quick on this thought came another, which told him she 
was a friend to many more besides himself. And he wanted her all to him- 
self. But he had two more evenings to hope for and pray for. She saved 
only two dances for him. He wanted one mure very much, and when he 
reproached her, she said, 

" ( )h, you know you are just my friend to-night, and there are many here 
to-night that enjoy that same privilege." 

" I know that," he answered grimly, " lint there's no need of rubbing the 
fact into a fellow." 

The next day went by heavily, as if it were loath to lose its hours. He 
was going with her, himself, to-night, and would the time ever come ? Some- 

97 



how he did not even hope for pink, It would suil the dull misery in his heart 
so much better if she wore green. Bui if she wore lavender — he knew they 
would never go to that dance it' her gown was lavender, ami thought bitterly 
that maybe she would rather wear green than miss the dance. 

Ho was punctual to the minute ami she did nut keep him waiting long 
enough to collect his thoughts. He heard the suit swish of her skirts on the 
stair, and arose as she neared the door. There was a soft, light behind her, 
and she stood there in the glow dressed all in white Not a touch of color 
anywhere. She had not even worn his roses, lint what did In- can-? She 
eared for him. ami wasn't that enough? lie forgot for the moment that sin- 
had told him when she cared lor anybody it was a little akin I" lov< — hut just 
a little. As he started toward her, she bowed mockingly, and said, " Milord." 
lie returned her bow gravely. She was just playing with him after all. and 
he had been so serious. The evening went quickly, mingled with happiness 
and pain for him, ami as it seemed, full of nothing hut happiness for her. 

The next two days crept on. The bitterness of waiting and of hopeless- 
ness had crept into his face, and made his grey eyes seem hard and cold. lb' 
had determined not to go to the dance until it was half over, lint a little 
after ten he could stand it no longer. He hastened to what would be the- hap- 
piest or the most detestable place in the world to him. and looked eagerly, 
anxiously for her! When he did see her, everything grew dim ami unsteady. 
She wore black ; soft clinging black. When he could see better lie noticed 
vaguely that it was not entirely black. A touch of pale gold shown through 
the meshes of her gown, and a sash of the same color, like a flame, was knot- 
ted around her waist. He asked for only one dance, and when it came he 
took her off to a dim little corner. 

"What does the brightness in your dress mean'.'" he said harshly. 
" Why is it there 9 What does it mean?" 

She looked straight at him, and there was no mockery in her eyes this 
time ; they looked soft and bright and earnest. 

" This," she said, touching the ribbon lightly as she rose to leave him, 
"this brightness is the memory of somebody, that L will keep forever." 

K. M. B., '03. 



THE STORY OF A WAVE 



S 



OMETIMES \YIIEN one has wished very much for something, has 
waited and longed and striven, disregarding all beside, to gain one dear 
object, the end has been attained at last — I" prove but sorrow. 



A long stretch of white sand glistening in the sunlight, a black cliff rising 
threateningly from the strip of beach, a lazy seagull or two dipping occasion- 
ally into the crest of the waves, and over all an unclouded arch of bluest 
heaven, is what the wave saw when it recovered from its first surprise of being 
so far in shore. 

Until now it had been miles away out at sea, and had known only an 
expanse of changing sky above and shifting sea below, while here among the 
many sights the sky alone was the only thing it had ever seen before. But 
the wave had always loved the clouds and the sky better than the great ocean 
and its own fellow-waves, so it was not afraid. Instead, it splashed a greeting 
as it touched the foot of the cliff for the first time, and then, slipping back a 
yard or two, it played idly with the pebbles and sea shells scattered around, 
gathering them into little heaps and murmuring softly over them, then, as a 
breeze came dancing up towards the shore, it scattered them once more and 
returned to the foot of the cliff. 

For a long time the wave was very happy. The shells on the beach were 
always ready to play with, and when it tired of these it would return the 
frowns of the cliff with dancing smiles, and mock at it with ripples of laugh- 
ter. And besides, it had but to raise its glance towards the sky to find new 
charms in the clouds wandering there. 

One day as it lay watching the big white clouds that drifted so ver}' 
slowly overhead, one attracted its notice particularly by its perfect whiteness, 
and the wave watched it as it crossed the sky and drew nearer and nearer the 
black cliff. It reached the rock and lingered over it, set off every dark pro- 
jection and darker crevice in strong relief, and the wave observed for the first 
time a bright spot of blue just at the top of the cliff. It gazed wondering, for 
the cloud had shut out the sky completely, and besides, that quiet heaven was 
different from this bit of blue that wavered and swayed at the breath of every 

99 



passing breeze. It was so strange that the wave-, to get a better view, ran 
back to meet an incoming billow, and as it rose high on the cresi it looked 
eagerly toward the top of the cliff. There was no blue sky there, only nod- 
ding' gracefully against the background of the soft, dazzling cloud, was a bank 
of dark blue Mowers which grew down to the very edge of the rock itself. The 
billow broke and fell and the wave rocked helplessly to and fro far below the 
flowers. 

The cloud sailed on unnoticed, for ai the top of the cliff there was left 
that spot of a deeper blue than the sky, and toward it the wave gazed always, 
never thinking again of the lost cloud or of the place the wave itself had come 
from, where the sea was deep. It knew now only a narrow strip of beach, 
and a black rock, and it looked and longed only for the Mowers thai grew at 
the top of the cliff. 

Day after day passed and the moon rose and set again and again ami still 
the wave thought only of the blue beauty of the Mowers above it. until the 
wish to reach them became the passion of its whole existence. It clung fast 
to the dear thought of attaining to them and in spite of all rebuff it would not 
be hopeless. It begged each billow to lift it on high, and sometimes its 
request was granted and it was happy, and at other times when it was caught 
up only to be swept out away from the shore, it did not reproach the big 
waves, but in sorrow came back to the foot of the cliff. 

At the ebb of the tide the wave was always the last to linger and to fol- 
low the others reluctantly out, and at the How it was always the first to break 
on the beach. As it looked at the Mowers, they became ever more beautiful 
and more intensely blue, whether it was in the dawn, when they were half- 
veiled in mist; at noon-day, in the free glory of the sunshine: in the quiet of 
evening; or at night, when they showed dimly in a brilliant flood of moon- 
light above the dark cliff. And even when they faded from view in the still 
starlight, the wave knew they were there and dreamed of their beauty. 

On very clear days the Mowers seemed only just beyond its reach, hut 
sometimes there were days when a clinging fog would blol them entirely out 
of its view, and then the earth and the sky seemed empty and blank and 
there was no meaning in either. But the fogs never lingered very long, and 
after a while a breeze would come from over the land anil roll the mist out to 
sea, bringing down to the lonely wave a breath of fragrance of such intoxica- 
ting sweetness that it would wander restless, unceasingly, until the fog was all 
gone and its dear flowers appeared again at the top of the cliff. 

The wave longed for them so much that there came to he. at last, more 
pain than pleasure in the sight of them there, so far above its level and beyond 



its reach. It wondered that the birds, who flew wherever they would, never 
seemed even to see the flowers, and it envied the .yellow butterflies that hovered 
over the precious spot of blue whenever the day was still and warm. 

So the wave grew weary of waiting and longing and dashed itself impa- 
tiently against the foot of the cliff in the effort to climb the sheer rock. It 
was in vain, and then — seeing that there was no other way — it began to wish 
that cruel storms might come, such as it had seen out at sea when the waters 
went dashing over lost vessels and tore them to pieces in fury. It knew that 
the same tempest could raise waves powerful enough to fling themselves to the 
very top of the cliff, and going with them the wave could attain its end, and 
reach the blue flowers. After this each dark day was eagerly welcomed, and 
even if rain and cloud did hide the flowers for a time, it did not matter to the 
wave ; it would reach them but the sooner. 

Time passed, and the weather grew steadily worse until it looked as if the 
hopes of the wave might indeed be realized. And then, there came a time at 
last, when one night the sea. and the sky were breathless and black and the 
waves were still, except for a. dull throbbing at the foot of the cliff. It was the 
wave, waiting for the coming of the storm it had prayed for. The air grew 
darker and darker, and, if possible, more still, anil the only sound was the 
ceaseless throbbing of the wave by the rock. Then, in a second, a flash of 
lightning had torn the heavens apart from end to end, a deafening roar of 
thunder had heralded the coming of the storm, and with a rush of wind and 
rain it burst on the cliff and over the cowering sea. All night it raged, and 
the billows that broke over the shore rose constantly higher and higher and 
with each the wave was lifted nearer the top of the cliff. The very air \vas 
full of terror, but the wave heeded nothing but the thought of the blue 
flowers, now invisible because of the oppressive blackness over everything. 
And when the night was nearly gone and the storm was fiercest, the wave 
found, to its joy, that the hugh billows were breaking almost at the edge of 
the rock above. It was wild with fear lest they should fall short, but each 
succeeding wave threw it nearer the flowers, until at last the dark waters, 
gathering for one mighty effort, rolled towards the rock, rose high in the air, 
and dashed over the top of the cliff ! 

The wave broke just on the bank at the edge — it had reached its blue 
flowers at last. 

And when the gray morning came, the storm left a desolate shore, strewn 
here and there with crushed and broken blue petals, that drifted slowly away 
out to sea, and a wave to sob forever at the foot of the cliff. 

E. B. M., '04. 



A SECRET. 



i. 

High up in the clouds, 1 have heard old folks say 
There once lived a maiden as fair as the day. 
The fairies adored her, and to show her (heir love, 
They gave her a necklace (in the land up above), 
A necklace of raindrops, as sparkingly bright 
As the stars that we see on a clear, cloudless night. 

II. 

The gift of the jewels made the maiden quite wealthy, 

And, moreover, she was both pretty and healthy, 

So suitors from near and suitors from far 

Came to ask the maid's hand of her doting papa ; 

But the maid would have none of them, till one sunny clay 

A gallant young knight came riding her way. 

III. 

He fell in love with the maiden, hut rich he was not, 
And he was too proud to ask her to share his poor lot. 
But his nature was passionate, and one moonlight night 
He told her he loved her, though he knew 'twas nol right. 
" I can't ask you, sweetheart, to marry me now. 
For your wealth divides us, hut I solemnly vow 

IV. 

That my fortune I'll make, and two years from this day 
I'll come hack to claim you and take you away." 
"Two years," the maiden's pink cheeks grew quite pale. 
As she clung to her lover's bright armor of mail, 
"And were I not rich, you'd now marry me? 
Oh, wait hut a minute, mv love, and you'll see." 



V. 

So saying the maid went indoors, to come baek 
A few minutes later, with a casket of black. 
"Sweetheart, look ! here are my riches so rare. 
See what for love of you I'll do and I'll dare." 
And quickly, impulsively, she broke with her might 
The necklace's string. At that the young knight — 

VI. 

Well, he did just what 1 know / would do, 
And, I venture to say, you agree with me, too. 
He took her at once for his love and his bride. 
And her father consenting, they rode off side by side. 

P. S.— 

The fairies? — they one and all understood 
The maiden's impulsive and passionate mood. 
The jewels? To you this secret I'll tell, 
Those very same stars that Ave all know so well, 
Xo matter what the old scientists say, 
Are the beautiful jewels the maid cast away. 

—A. K. G., '04. 



103 



A PROMISING EPISODE. 



WITH APOLOGIES TO THE AUTHOR OF "THE DOLLY DIALOGUES." 

IT WAS the last of May. The air was soft and balmy and all the world 
bright and gay. It may have been the effect of an unusually good din- 
ner, or of nature itself, but it seemed to me as I walked back from the 

club that life was a pleasant thing indeed. And the thought of pleasant 
things brought Lady Miekleham to my mind immediately, and I suddenly 
discovered that the one thing necessary to make the day ideal was the presence 
of Dolly. My time was my own for a few hours, so why shouldn't I add to 
the day that one thing it needed and pay Lady Miekleham a call? 

But 1 have often found that thinking of angels has the same effect as speak- 
ing of them — they invariably appear — and for once Lady Miekleham did not 
make an exception to the rule, for, walking through the park, I caught a 
glimpse of a lavender dress with a bewitchingly piquant head rising above a 
billowy white creation, and 1 knew that Lady Miekleham was enjoying her 
afternoon drive. As 1 saluted her, she stopped the victoria and insisted on my 
going home with her for a cup of tea. So with some reluctance, and some 
murmuring about " a drive," and "Mrs. Musgrave," I yielded. For 1 find 
that a woman generally appreciates your company most when she thinks some 
other woman desires it ; so I got into the victoria. Whenever I settle back 
among the soft cushions of Lady Mickleham's victoria, I can not blame Dolly 
Foster for being Lady Miekleham instead of Mrs. Carter. 

"Well," said Dolly, with that insolent smile of hers, while she lazily surveyed 
my face and perceived something of what I felt. " Don't you think it pays?" 

" Undoubtedly," remarked 1. Dolly hadn't said whether the payment was 
agreeable or just. " But which one?" 

"Mr. Carter," rebuked Lady Miekleham, " if you are going to be impu- 
dent, I shall drop you at the next corner." This with a severe straightening 
of the lips that brought to my mind the thought of a bow when the arrow is 
spent. Even as I was thinking of this, the lips curved up and that adorable 
dimple in the cheek appeared, as I heard a low laugh. 

" Well," reminded I, lazily. 

104 



"Impudence," mused Doll)', "brings back an incident that occurred last 
night at Mrs. Hilary Musgrave's. Archie took Mrs. Robinson-Smith in to 
dinner and I went with Mr. Robinson-Smith. Something about his face 
troubled me. When, every now and then, he cast an adoring glance at his 
wife, his expression made me think of sonic one — 1 could not remember whom. 
Before many courses we began to talk about 'ideals,' ami 'dreams of youth,' 
and lie remarked how proud boys were of their love affairs. Then he said 
that he had never had but one love affair that had seemed promising, and that 
was five years ago, for he had known Maizie four — another devoted look. I 
agreed that I had had one too." Dolly was looking pensively out of the 
other side of the victoria. It is useless to say where I was looking. Then 
she resumed, "So he suggested that we exchange confidences. Well, it was 
five years ago — the first winter I was out — ami it happened at a gennan. He 
was just from school spending the Christinas holidays at a friend's. She was 
fresh, sweet, innocent, 'a darned pretty chit of a thing,' a Miss Foster. He 
met her in a chance figure and rushed her the rest of the evening ; promised 
to call the next day ami to write every clay after he left, told her how much 
he cared for her, etc. He said that she had believed him and that he. 
too, had believed all he had said, until he met Maizie that summer, lie won- 
dered what had become other, poor child !" 

During this recital 1 was thinking to myself that Dolly must have felt to 
Mr. Robinson-Smith as I ought to have felt to Lady Micklehani ; but then, 
Lady Micklehani was adorably pretty, and so I said "ought to have" instead 
of " must have." 

"The impudence of thinking that the innocent Miss Foster cared!" 
laughed Dolly and the dimple. And it occurred to me that the laugh was 
caused by the "darned pretty chit of a thing." Now I know that there are 
some girls who would not care to lie labelled thus, but they are not Dolly, and 
I am sure that it was this master stroke that cleared Mr. Robinson-Smith from 
Lady Micklehani's black book. 

The victoria stopped at Lady Micklehani's residence. " But," protested 
I, "you haven't told me your promising episode." 

"Come in and have a cup of tea and 1 will." twinkled Lolly. Now I 
had promised to drive with Mrs. Musgrave that afternoon, and Lady Mick- 
lehani knew it ; but as 1 looked at Dolly and the dimple, I got out slowly 
and walked up the path with Dolly Foster; although 1 knew I should be 
scratched off Mrs. Musgrave's visiting list until 1 had paid due penance. 

In the house Dolly made tea. She has a way of so absorbing herself in 
this skillful operation that I can lie back on the divan and, as a connoisseur, 



admire her 6ne points. Secretly she knows this, and privately I think she 
prolongs the process unnecessarily. However, I like a womanly woman ; let 
her be vain ; and vain enough to hide her vanity. 

Having put exactly the righi amount of sugar and cream into my cup of 
tea, Dolly brought me the cup and sat down beside me "ii the divan. For a 
moment she looked severe, and said, "so I suppose you agree with him that 
it was promising. Suppose Miss Foster had caved, how do you think she 
would have felt ?" 

"I know perfectly," said I, and Dolly turned her head away quickly. 

" Poor Nellie," mused I. (Miss Phaeton's name is Nellie — also Mrs. Mus- 
grave's). Dolly looked at me suddenly. I was looking oul the window. 

"Nellie'.' Oh !" ejaculated Dolly. 

Score one for me: hut 1 do so love to see Dolly blush that from the 
height of my victory 1 was kind to the defeated. "After all you are quits. 
He had his Maizie and you your Monte Carlo — both three years ago." Deep 
silence. "Dolly," said 1, sitting up straight, "will you tell me if you told 
him that as your promising episode V" 

The curtains parted, and Lord Mickleham walked in. I am sure the 
delighted way in which Dolly greeted him was more for tin' interruption than 
for Archie. No matter; some time in the dim hereafter 1 expect to meet 
Dolly face to face without any interruptions from Lord Mickleham, and — but 
I am afraid it will he only in the dim hereafter! M. A. S.. '03. 



106 



THE GREAT JOY UNTO ALL PEOPLE 



i 

THE DAYS hail conic when Cesar decreed that all the world should he 
taxed. To the little town of Bethlehem, which was also known as the 
eitv of David, came every man who was of the house ami lineage of 
David. The dwellings of Bethlehem were filled to running over and 
the inn also, and every man was kin to his neighbor. The village inn stood 
hardby the wall and there dwelt Ir, the keeper. From each guest he took a 
copper penny but to the last he said, 

"Thou shalt take of the room that is left, but there is room for no more." 

Ruth followed her father in and looked about her and saw many pilgrims 
with their beasts of burden laden with pots for cooking and beds for spreading. 
She looked for she could not hear the jingling of the bells, or the cracking of whips, 
or the munching of beasts outside ; for her ears were closed — perhaps, forever. 

As she looked there came a stranger to the door, a man heavily bearded, 
and by his hand he led a mule upon which sat the drooping figure of a 
woman. The man talked long and earnestly to the innkeeper and seemed to 
be pleading for something — she could not tell what. Then the man led the 
mule to the stable and lifted down his drooping wife. 

That night when Ruth lay down, she saw through the slit in the wall, a 
star. It was very bright, brighter than it had ever been before, and she had 
watched it for several nights. 

In the morning she awoke and the sun was shining through the slit. And 
when she had dressed, her mother led her by the hand to the stable. On the 
straw lay the woman and nearby in a manger was a beautiful babe — more 
beautiful than the sun. And around the manger stood several roughly clad 
shepherds kneeling in adoration. She looked at her mother, then leaned over 
and kissed the babe, and as her lips touched it, her ears were opened — and she 
heard. L. T., '05. 

II. 

Seven shepherds were gathered around a large bonfire. Across the valley 
on the side of the opposite hill they could see another bonfire — smaller, though, 
and seemingly less cheerful. Every now and then one of the company would 



turn to look at this; they were used to its being there, but to-nighl it burned 
lower, as if the tender had forgotten it. 
"It's a pity," one shepherd said. 

"Yes," answered another, "1ml we must not forget what Matthias did." 

" The sou did not do it, though, Asa," said the slender young hoy. 

"No, but the son of Matthias cannot belong to us. Do von not remem- 
ber, Surasky. when he ran that night, and how his whole family had to move 
away?" 

"But look ! the lire is almost out," the hoy exclaimed. 

Slowly and impressively the oldest shepherd arose; and a hush fell on the 
others. 

" You all know thai I have always stood by our laws, hut I cannot help 
loving that boy, although he is the son of Matthias: and, 1 am going to see 
what is the matter." 

Still and silent they gazed at the sturdy, strong figure of their leader 
while he spoke, and they remained thus until the hoy of their company again 
exclaimed : 

"0, father, look ! the tire is out ! 1 will go, too." 

"And I" — "and I " — "and 1 " — said the others. 

"And I, too," said Asa, slowly. 

One shepherd, a mere boy, knelt before a small bonfire. Across the val- 
ley on the side of the opposite hill, he, too, could sec another bonfire — larger, 
though, and more cheerful. Every now and then he looked at it and the look 
was always very wistful. He was used to its being there, but to-night it burned 
brighter, as if the tenders were feeding it more abundantly than usual. 

" 1 do not mind it," he thought, " but mother at home is so lonely. Even 
Asa's wife, who always used to sit in the market with her, will not speak to 
her. And children point at her and — " 

He stops, the fire burns very low. his head feels so queer, and is it true, 
or does he dream that the shepherds '.' 

A burst of light, a multitude of voices singing 

" 1'eaee on earth, good will towards men I" 

In wondrous harmony, in marvellous sweetness, in stupendous volume, it 
comes again, and again, and again. 

" Peace on earth, good will towards men!" 

Lower and lower, sinks the body of the lone shepherd boy in self-abase- 
ment; higher and higher, reaches his soul in adoration, until, at last, his body 
can sink no lower, his soul can reach no higher. To him came first the peace 
the angels sang. S. J., '05. 

108 






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4n aJ -*j-<i tot %** !«u< </*. ^o^- &*. 
■"W.^aX. 

QjJsrf *KMr> Ifvft, tLoJ} fejUi. *M*iA*- a. £/ ?*c>u 

/ojJl. 




\* 



ONE ASPECT OF THE FIRE 



THE HALL was wrapt in slumber. Long ago the bell had rung. All 
was silent save the noise which came from the girl who " didn't snore." 
But through the stillness came the distressed cry of " Fire! Fire!" 
"Oh ! girls, run. Run," called Mildred, who, clad in silk raglan and 
snowy furs, rushed from her room. The next instant Minnie's sleepy voice 
called out, "Kitty, is it time to take a bath?" 

Kitty, clad in red, appeared at the door and saw Elizabeth Temple's n t- 

matc struggling to get that young lady's hat safely out. Miss Thomas rushed 
out with her bottle of red ink to quench the flames, as she often does our lurid 
love stories. 

The hall was tilled with girls in gay and grotesque costumes. " Where's 
Marie?" cried Sturgeon, rushing back to find Marie. Gussie, Leize and Ann 
on their knees searching for Marie's red bandana. 

"But where's the fire?" called some one, and Mildred, in a sheepish voice 
answered, " Well, girls, I must have had a night mare." 



RECITAL 



BY THE OLD MAIDS AND BACHELORS 

1. Solo, ...... My love is young and fair, 

My love hath dark brown hair. 

Miss Haughton. 

2. Solo, . . Can you make a cherry pie, Willie boy, Willie boy? 

Miss Bridukrs. 

•'->. Recitation, ....... Two Maiden Aunts. 

Misses Brumby and Smith. 

4. Solo, . . Oh ! that I may be loved by someone whom 1 love. 

Miss Hunter. 

5. Solo, ......... Moonlight Sonata. 

Miss Coleman. 

6. Solo, . . . Oh, where, oh, where, has ray little doggone? 

Miss BuRGWYN. 

7. Solo, ..... Absence makes the heart grow fonder. 

Miss Glazebrook. 



113 



THE EAST ROCK 



This truth by sages is confest 
That still the happy nation 's blest 
Which hath no history much to tell, 

Since runs its course so smooth and well : 
So runs it with the old East Rock, 
Where dwells a calm and studious Mock, 
Who lawless ne'er their guardian "shock. 
Nor ever dread that guardian's knock ! 
They peaceful keep from day to day 
The "even tenor of their way." 
And noiselessly their days all glide, 
While they in faithful work abide; 
And if without is Winter's gloom, 
Within there is a cozy room, 
Where steaming Tea a fragrance lends, 
And Welcome kind its warmth extends, 
" Chamber of Peace ami Counsel" sweet, 
Where friend and teacher oft they meet : 
There cups they quaff of grateful glow, 
Their wants and needs they freely show. 
While ready sympathy they find, 
Their hearts in Christian love to hind ! 
So in the old East Hock to-day 
For curious ears we've naught to say. 
But when these peaceful days have gone 
How sweet their memory will live on ! 



114 



LOOK PLEASANT, PLEASE 



Mr. B. — "Miss H., what is the Senior Class motto?" 

Miss H. (with pride)—" Loke uppe on live." 

Mr. B. — " Good gracious ! Nothing but a rubber-neck !" 

Miss T. — "Miss %., what mark of punctuation is most frequently used?" 
Miss Z. — "Interrogation point, by women, Miss Thomas." 

Why is J. H. so fond of the Pass of Thermopyke ? 

A. W. -(at the fire) — "Jennie, where on earth are you going with that 
bucket?" 

J. M., (in great haste and excitement) — "To the fire, of course; where 
did you expect? Don't stop me!" 

A. W. — " What g I will the bucket do?" 

J. M.— " My father ! ! 1 thought it was full !" 

Miss T. — " I want you girls on my floor to stop using slang. You must 
cut it out." 

I. R. and F. <i. (with books containing paragraph selections from various 
authors) — " Miss Thomas, who was ' Ibid ?' We have looked in several ency- 
clopedias and can find nothing about him." 



i '• 5 



OURSELVES SEEN AS OTHERS SEE US 



Behind the vail, behind the vail. 

MILDRED TILTON. 

Necessary evils. 

CONNIE ARTHUR, ELOISE ZIMMERMAN, IDA EVANS, 
MINNIE BEEBE. KATE GLAZEBROOK, FANNIE WILLIAMS, 
ISABEL RUFF, AMORET WOOTTEN, LOUISE EVANS. 

"Flames in the forehead of the morning sky." 

MARY PAYNE, ELMER GEORGE, MILDRED TILTON, 

DORA McRAE, VIRGILIA GLAZEBROOK, KATHARINE MEARES. 

"The hand of little employment hath the daintiest sense." 

JULIA EAUGHTON. 



"The choice and master spirit of its age." 
"Thinking is but an idle waste of thought." 



' Thou sayest an undisputed fact 
In such a solemn way." 



" Sang in tones of deep emotion 
Songs of love and songs of longing 



1 In the hope to meet 
Shortly again and make our absence sweet." 



116 



TI1K JUNIOR (LASS. 



ANN GIFFORD. 



ROSALIE BERNHARDT. 



FANNIE WILLIAMS. 



SENIOR CLASS. 



Nursing her wrath to keep it warm." 



VIRGILIA GLAZEBROOK 



" What's mine is yours and what is yours is mine." 

THE ROOM OF THE BIG FIVE. 



' Who goeth a borrowing 
Goeth a sorrowing'." 



'Then he will talk — good gods ! how he will talk. 



"Tis not a lip, or eye, we beauty call. 
But the joint force and full result of all.' 



MARY GRAMLING. 



IDA EVANS. 



OCTAVIA HUGHES. 



Remove not the ancient landmark ! 



KATHARINE MEARES. 



Some of us live on the reputation of the reputation we might have made. 

ANNIE ROOT. 



Much may be said on both sides. 

Sighed and looked and sighed again. 

With meek and unaffected grace. 

Girls. — " Of what use will it be, sir?" 
Dr. B. — " Never mind the use ; do it." 

And spread the truth (?) from pole to pole. 



THE DEBATE. 



MARY DIXON. 



/ 
SADIE JENKINS. 



HELOLSE BEEBE. 



' Tis hard to part when friends are dear. 

MARY GRAVES AND MARY GRAMLING. 

117 



Ful vvel she sang the service divine; 
Entuiicd in her nose ful semely ; 
And French she spake i'nl fayiv and fetisly 
After the schole at Strattford-atte-Bowe, 
For French of Paris was to her unknowe. 



Ll'CY REDWOOD. 



In notes by distance made more sweet. 



EVELYN WEEKS. 



Mv Father!!' 



JENNIE Ml'RCHISON. 



Nowher so besy a man as he ther n'as, 
And yet he seemed besier than he was. 



ESTHER MEANS. 



Grieving's a folly. 
Come, let us be jolly. 



ELOISE ZIMMERMAN. 



A kind (if excellent, dumb discourse 



Learning by study must lie won. 

' Twas never entailed from son to son. 



Laugh at your friends, and, if your friends arc sore. 
So much the better. You may laugh the more. 



M. 1K>I. MAN. 



A. CHESHIRE 



EDITORS OF "THE MUSI 



Or if by chance we stay our minds on aught. 
It is some picture on the margin wrought. 



THE MUSE." 



I IS 



BOARD OF EDITORS 



Katharine de Rosset Meares 

Mary Wood Winslow, 

Annie Gales Root, 

Mary Ferrand Henderson, 

Mary Allan Short, 

Annie Webb Cheshire, . 



Editor-in-Chief. 

Business Manager. 

Literary Editor. 

Assistant Literary Editor. 

. Editor-on-Illust rations. 

Editor-on- Advertisements. 



119 



S$/f over now, e. rce/i f r/>//af t&e j//ff.)/ 



DOBBIN & 
FERRALL 






123 and 125 Fayetteville Street 

RALEIGH, 

NORTH 

CAROLINA 



Sellers of tbe Best 

Dry Goods-of AH Kinds 

OUR SPECIAL FREE DELIVERY MAIL ORDER SYSTEM IS AT 

YOUR SERVICE 

We prepay express or freight charges anywhere in North Carolina 
on all cash mail orders of $,S-oo or more. We will gladly mail 
samples of Dress Goods, Silks, White Goods — or anything that may 
be sampled & ft, ft, ft, 5. ft, ft, ft, ft, ft, ft, ft, 



Write or Telephone us 



DOBBIN (EL FERRALL 




; ^%|Illp 



/j5 



A Graceful Carriage 



DISTINGUISHES EVERY 



I.ADY WHO WEARS 

Hunter Bros. & BretDer's Shoes 



SUCCESSORS TO DANIEL ALI.EN A 



210 Fayetteoille St. 



Because they 
fit, are well- 
made, nicely 
finished inside 
and are so 
gracefully and 
elegantly 
shaped, it ex- 
cites a sense of 
pride in their 
wearer 



RALEIGH, N. C. 




I 



^Department Store 

Double Millinery Parlors-Up Stairs 



Dress Goods, Silks, Velvets, Para- 
sols. Gloves, Fans, Laces and Em- 
broideries. Ladies' Ready-made 
Wear. Muslin Underwear and Cor- 
sets. Sterling Silver Novelties and 
Leather Goods Trunks, Suit Cases 
and Ladies' Fine Footwear. 
Agents for Standard Patterns :: :: 



Trustworthy goods only at uni- 
formly right prices. All articles 
guaranteed as represented. 
Money refunded to dissatisfied 
buyers. Experienced salespeople 
in each and every department. 
You will find the store as good as 
advertised :: :: :: :: :: :: :: :: :: :: 




203 and 205 Fayetteville Street, 



RALEIGH, NORTH CAROLINA 



ST. MARY'S SCHOOL 




RALEIGH. NORTH CAROLINA 



Established l 642 



Full course in Literature, Languages, Sci- 
ence, Art, Music and Business. Excellent 
Kindergarten under Miss Louise T. Busbee's 
charge. Centrally located. Complete mod- 
ern sanitary conveniences. For Catalogue 
and particulars address 



LENT TERH BEGINS _, ^ „ „_„ 

jftNUARYz? Rev. T. D. BRATTON. P3.D. 



Do 

You 

Read? 

Do 

You 
Write ? 



ALL ORDERS 

GIVEN OUR PERSONAL 

ATTENTION. 




Mg 



If you read, 

we have everything 

you want in 

books and 

periodicals and 

you get 

your orders 

filled by return 

mail and at 

satisfactory prices. 

If you write, 

we have everything 

from a 

steel pen and 

5c. pad to 

Hurd's fine papers 

and gold pens. 



v^ 



Alfred Williams & Co., 

RALEIGH, N. C. 



Zachary 

Mantel 

Company 



Thos. H. Briggs & Sons 



INCORPORATED 



v. <"*■ 



Headquarters for 



Ibarbwoob 
flfeantels, 
Uiles 
anb 

(Brates 



If you are in Deed of anything in 

our line we shall be glad 

to figure on your 

requirements 



RALEIGH, SI. C. 



HARDWARE OF ANY DE- 
SCRIPTION 

Cutlery, 

Bicycles, 

House 

Furnishing 

Goods 



RANGES. COOKING AND HEATING 
STOVES 



prescriptions*,,. 



Every druggist says that his drugs 
are pure. Every druggist says 
that he does not substitute. Every 
druggist says that he does not 
use inferior or adulterated drugs. 
Every druggist says that he does 
accurate work. What is there 
left for us to say different from 
anybody else? Well, we invite 
you to bring your prescription 
here and see the kind of treat- 
ment you get in our store, and 
notice the way everything is done, 
and then see if you do not feel 
that the medicine is put up just as 
your doctor would like to have it. 



Zachary Mantel Co. 

108 West Martin St. RALEIGH, N. C. 



1Uc 

arc open 
Oajj -iiio nigbt 



©obtutUlUvnnc 
©rug Company 



<Jvnow 



YOU ARE HAVING THE BEST 

WHEN YOU 

HAVE 




Wharton 



RALEIGH'S HIGH - CLASS PHO- 
TOGRAPHER DO YOUR WORK 



J. J. THOMAS, President 
B. S. JERMAN, Cashier 



A. A. THOMPSON, Vice-President 
H. W. JACKSON, Asst. Cashier 



REPORT OF THE CONDITION OF 

THE COMMERCIAL AND FARMERS BANK 

OF RALEKiH, N" C. 

AT CLOSE OF BUSINESS, FEBRUARY 6, 1903 



RESOURCES 

Loans and Discounts, 
Overdrafts, .... 

N. C. 4 per cent, and other Bonds, 
Banking-house and Fixtures, 
Other Real Estate owned. 



$415,280.54 
3,632.66 
43-037-50 
iS, 702. 48 
13,658.31 



CASH 



Due from Banks, . 
Cash Items and Checks, 
Gold and Silver Coin, 
Currency, 



Total Resources, 



$141,494.11 
6, 976. 49 
20, 268, 40 
27,032.00 



LIABILITIES 



$690,082,49 



Capital Stock Paid in Cash, 
Surplus and Net Profits, 

DEPOS 

Due Banks. - ... 

Due Depositors, . 
Cashier's Checks, 



Total Liabilities, 



I [00, 000. 00 
53,301.02 



$12,492.58 

522,756.60 

1,532-29 



■ $536,781-47 



$690,082.49 

I, B. S. Jerman, Cashier of the above-named Bank, do solemnly swear that the above si atemeut is true to the 
best of my knowledge and belief. B. S JERMAN, Cashier. 

State of North Carolina— County of Wake 

Sworn to and subscribed before me this ioth day of February, 1903. E. B. CROW, Notary Public. 

Correct— Attest : J. J. THOMAS, R. B. RANEY, CAREY J. HUNTER, JAS. E. SHEPHERD 

ASHLEY HORNE, THOS. H. BRIGGS, JOSHUA B. HILL ASHBY L. BAKER, 

Directors. 



Safe Deposit Boxes for Rent 



No Interest Paid on Deposits 



BOYLAN, PEARCE & CO. 



206-8 Fauetteoille Street 



dt 



203-5 Salisbury Street 



RALEIGH, NORTH CAROLINA 



Dress floods, millinery, tailored Costumes 

Ulraps, Fancy floods, trimmings, Gloves, hosiery, Handkerchief- , 

Underwear, notions and Fancy floods. 



MAIL ORDERS FILLED INTELLIGENTLY AND PROMPTLY 



Robbins 

Livery 

Stable 



Cow Prices 
Tine 'turnouts 



4 



V 



Carriages of 
every Hind 
at Every Hour 
for everything 



Promptness 

and Courtesy Paid 

to all Orders 



DRIVE IN A 

Rubber=Tired Carriage 

FROM THE RIGHT 
PLACE 



Phone 79 



JAS. H. ROBBINS 



E. B. BARBEE C. B. BARBEE 

MEMBERS NEW YORK 
COTTON EXCHANGE 



BARBEE & COMPANY 

Commission /Iftercbants 

Cotton, Stocks, Grain, 
Provisions 



PRIVATE WIRE TO NEW YORK ORDERS FOR FUTURE DELIV- 

AND CHICAGO jtjtjtj*jt.jtj*jtj* ERY PROMPTLY EXECUTED J« 



RALEIGH, NORTH CAROLINA 



EM. 
UZZELL 



CORNER WILMINGTON AND MARTIN STREETS 



printer 

anb 

JSinfcer 



RALEIGH, - NORTH CAROLINA 



R. H. BATTLE, Pres. ALEXANDER WEBB, Vlce-Pres. CHARLES ROOT, Sec. and Trea*. 



THE NORTH CAROLINA 

IDome Insurance Company 

OF RALEIGH, N. C. 

1868 ESTABLISHED 1868 

©ives protection B gainst TLoss bg Over 51,000.000 %os$cs pato En 

ffire ano ILigbtniini Jtjtjxjtjtjfijfij* IHortb Carolina.* jtJtjtJtjtjtjtjtJt 

Insure your properly against fire and lightning in this Company. It is a 
home institution seeking home patronage. It lias been successful in 
business for more than thirty-four years. It is safe, solid, reliable aDd 
worthy of confidence. In patrouiziug it you help to build up North Carolina 

AGENTS WANTED IN UNOCCUPIED TERRITORY 



FIRST NATIONAL BANK 

OF RALEIGH 

Capital $225,000.00 
Surplus and Undivided Profits 

$100,000.00 



v^ 



SAFE DEPOSIT BOXES IN FIRE AND BURGLAR-PROOF VAULT 

FOR RENT 



ROBERT SIMPSON 

druggist 

Cor. Hillsboro and n a t t7V/^ t_t t^t /-" 
Salisbury Sts. KALtUCjO, IN. C 

W. H. HUGHES ° K ' 1LER 



China, Crockery, Glassware, Lamps, Table Cut- 
lery, Silver-plated Ware, Filters, Refrigerators, 
Tea Trays, Oil Stoves, a General Line of House 
Furnishi. g Goods. Agent for the O lorless Re- 
ft ie era tor 



127 Fayetteville Si. 



RALEIGH. N. C. 



216 Fayetteville St 
Kalkigh, N. C 



OAK CITY 
STEAM LAUNDRY 



Domestic or Gloss Finish 
as Desired 

Phone 87 J. K. MARSHALL, Prop. 



W. B. MANN. 



Wholesale C^rTtr/?* 
and Retail KJIKJ\~<Ci 



No 5 E. Hargett St. 



Phone 101 



WEATHERS & UTLEY 



DEALERS IN 



Picture Frames, Artists' Materials, Win (lav 

Shades and Wall Paper, Curtain 

Poles. Pictures, etc 



SILVER NOVELTIES 



HOLIDAY GOODS 



Jolly & Wynne Jewelry Co. 



Watches, Clocks, Jewelry, Silverware Spectacles and 

Eyeglasses. Repairing Fine Watches, Jrwelry 

and Silverware a Specialty. 



Dr. V. E. TURNER 

..'Dentist.. 

RALEIGH, NORTH CAROLINA 



R 



R. F. GIERSCH 

i. a. ^ For Ladies and 

tSiaUraiH v> Gentlemen 

216 Fayetteville St. 



JOS. C. ELLINGTON, Jr. 

Pictures. Artists' Materials, Wall-papers 
and Window Shades. Embroidery Silks, 
Wools and Zephyrs :: :: .: :: ;: :: :: 



Raleigh, 



North Carolina 



CAPUDINE 

Cures Colds, LaGrippe and all Head- 
aches. 

H. T. HICKS CO. 



MAIL ORDERS FILLED PROMPTLY AT 

B. W. Upchurch's 

Cash Grocery 

Nothing but the best goods sold at prices that have 
no equal. 



Dr. D. E. EVERITT_ 

Dentist 



J23>2 Fayetteville Street 
128 Fayetteville St. RALEIGH, N. C. Raleigh J* & J* North Carolina 



For the Choicest and Best, at the 

California 
jfrnit Store 

ALEX. VURNAKES, - Proprietor 

133 Fayetteville Street 
Raleigh, N. C. 



IDarneU's 



jfine fllMUiner^ 



High Class Goods and 
Ykhy Latest Novelties 
at All Times :: :: :: :: 



WALTER WOOLLCOTT 
14 E. Martin St. Raleigh, N. C. 



Matson's 



fl>botograpb (Bailer^ Ipbotograpb (Bailey 



fl>ag bfm a visit 



jfine IRoses 
Carnations 

And other cut flowers for all occasions 
always on hand. Floral Designs at 
short notice. Palms, Ferns and all 
kinds of pot and out-of-door bedding 
plants, Roses, Geraniums. Scarlet 
Sage, Chrysanthemums, Vines, etc, 

H. STEINMETZ, Florist 

Phone 113 RALEIGH, N. C. 



■Uaill appreciate vour 
patronage 



Jones & Ipowell 



Retailers 

and 
Jobbers of 



HORSE AND COW FEED 

coal, iicc, wood, 
lumber, latbs 

SAWED AND SHAVED PINE AND CY- 
PRESS SHINGLES 

m.- „f Fayetteville Street Office, No 41 

Pnones j Coa , Yard 0Scej No -, 

.I6v> Car Xoao to am: IRatlroae Bepot 



H. Mahler's Sons 

Watches 
andjeivelry 

STERLING SILVERWARE 

Clocks 
Diamonds 



We Make Candy 



THAT 
IS OUR 
PURPOSE IN 
LIFE 



We Make it Fresh and 
Nice 



228 Fayetteville Street, Raleigh, N. C. A. D. ROYSTER & BRO 



J. G. BALL 



^ 



Wholesale 
Grocer 



*$ 



Harnett Street, RALEIGH, N. C. 



Woollcott's Grocery 



THAT'S ALL 



The Citizens National Bank 

RALEIGH, NORTH CAROLINA 



Capital, = - - - $100,000.00 
Surplus and Profits, - - 75,000.00 

Deposits, - 750,000.00 



The Same Careful Attention Given to Small Accounts as to Larger Ones. 
Correspondence and Personal Calls Invited. 



HENRY E. LITCHFORD, Cashier JOS. G. BROWN, President 



Stylish Turnouts. Nice Driving. 
A 
& H O L D E R and Gentlemen 



Ul LHUKLH 



Livery, Sale, Boarding, Transfer 

AND EXCHANGE STABLES 



Heavy hauling and excavating. Orders of every kind receive prompt, careful and 

courteous treatment. Marriages and Funerals our specialty. 

We solicit your custom for day or night. 



Upchurch & Holder 

All Telephones No. 81 Salisbury St., Raleigh, N. C. 



TRe Standard Gas & Electric Co. 



Invites you to call at their office and inspect their line 
of Gas Stoves. Get your Gas Stove now and be happy 




THE GAS STOVE 
Saves time, labor, worry and money. 




Ever ready and on lime. Your meals will 
never be late if you use a Gas Slove 



THE STANDARD GAS & ELECTRIC COMPANY 

124 Fayetteville Street 



LIGHT ! 

The 

Welsbach Light 

is the 

nearest 

approach 

to 

natural light 

yet 

discovered. 

Therefore 

it is best for you 

to use. 




LIGHT ! 

Best of light is 

gas light. 

It is the lightest 

light. 

Lightest on yom 

nerves, lightest on 

your eyesight, 

lightest on your 

pocket-book, 

lightest in the 

sense of giving the 

most light 



IF YOU WOULD SAVE YOUR EYES 

AND HELP YOUR BANK ACCOUNT. USE THE 



Welsbach Light 



Carolina Trust 
Company 



OFFICERS 



W. W MILLS, 



President 



LEO D. HEARTT, Vice-Pres. and Gen. Manager 
ROBT. C. STRONG, Trust Officer and GeD. Counsel 
WILLIAM HAVES Cashier 



CAPITAL STOCK, $100,000.00 



DIRECTORS 

JAMES WEBB 
J. D. RIGGAN 
CHARLES B HART 
ALEXANDER WEBB 
JULIUS LEWIS 
LEO D. HEARTT 
F T WARD 
W. W MILLS 
ALLEN J. RUPFIN 
W C. PETTY 
P. R. ALBRIGHT 
ROBERT C STRONG 



TRUSTS, LOANS, BANKING, SAFE DEPOSITS 



Transacts General Banking and Savings Bank- 
ing Business; also acts as Financial Agent for 
the floating of Stocks and Bonds of Municipal. 
Railroad, Cotton Mills and other corporations. 
Acts as Executor. Administrator, Guardian, 
Trustee, Assignee, Receiver, Broker, A^eut. 
Interest paid on deposits iu Savings Department, 
"Home Savings" Boxes, strong and convenient, 
furnished without cost to you :: :: :: :: :: :: :: 



Oftiices in 

Carolina Trust Building 



Raleigh, N. C. 



JNO. T. PULLEN, President 



J. O LITCHFORD, Cashier 



REPORT OF THE CONDITION OF THE 

RALEIGH SAVINGS BANK 

Made to the Corporation Commission at 
the Close of Business, February 6, 1903 



RESOURCES 
Loans and Discounts, 
Overdrafts, 
Bonds at par, 

Cash and Due from Banks, 
Banking House, 
Other Real Estate, . 
Stocks at par 



$397,471-68 

2-56 

6r, 350.00 

S5, 453-95 

12,800.00 

3,800.00 

7. 987-5° 

fo6S.865.69 



LIABILITIES 

Capital Stock $15,00000 

Surplus Fund, .... 15,00000 
Undivided Profits . . . 3,188.44 
Reserved Interest for Deposi- 
tors, ..... 5,60000 



Deposits 53°,°77-25 



$568,865.69 



FOUR PER CENT INTEREST ALLOWED ON DEPOSITS 



Z. m Blafee 



Jetceler 



FINE WATCH AND SILVER REPAIR- 
ING A SPECIALTY 



Faijettetifne street Raleigh, N. C. 



Dughi's Restaurant 

Jfruit ant* 
Confectionery 

OYSTER AND ICE CREAM PARLOR 

Caterer for Weddings, Parties, Etc. 

Furnish China, Silverware, 

Linen, Etc. 



M Rosenthal 



All Phones 123 



RALEIGH, N C. 



W. H. King Drug Co. 

OUR SODA WATER 
IS FAMOUS 



Everything used in the making is First 

Quality, Pure, and we serve 

it right 

SOLE AGENTS FOR 

HUYLER'S FINE CANDIES 



M. Rosenthal & Co. 

family 
(Sroccries 

Foreign and Domestic Wines, Liquors and 

Cordials for Family Use, Imported 

and Domestic Cigars. 



We Solicit your patronage and 
perfect satisfaction is guaranteed 



Corner Fayctteoillc 
and Hargett Streets 



Raleigh, N. C. 



G. W. Marsh & Son 



DEALERS in 



Corner Fayettecille 
and Hargett Streets 



Raleigh, N. C. 



Stall No a 
City Market 



Vegetables, fruits 

Cbicftens 

i£i30s 

etc. 

CONSIGNMENTS SOLICITED 

Raleigh, N. C. 



W. C. Stronaeh's Sons 
Company 



(Brocevs 



213 Fayettecille St. RALEIGH, N. C. 



Young & 
Hughes 



122 Fayetteville Street 
RALEIGH. N. C. 



FINE SANITARY PLUMBING 

IN ALL BRANCHES 

PROMPTLY 

DONE 



Estimates furnished on 
steam and hot water heat- 
ing anywhere in the 
State. A full stock of 
up-to-date fixtures and 
supplies constantly on 
hand :: :: :: :: :: :: :: 



Alford, Bynum & 
Christophers 

Printers 



Are anions the leading Printers of the City. 
Prompt, Reliable and Responsible. The 
cheapest when quality and work- 
manship are considered. 



115 E. HargettSt. 



RALEIGH, N. C. 



B. W. BAKER 



Wood and 
Coal 



TELEPHONE 140 



Joshua B. Hill 



J. R. Ferrall 



J. R. Ferrall & Company 

Grocers 



ALL THE NICE CAKES, CRACKERS, 
PICKLES, Etc. 



RALEIGH TELEPHONE No. 267 222l^teville St. RALEIGH, N. C. 



RICHMOND MEAT MARKET 



RICHMOND MEAT MARKET 



J. SCHWARTZ 



Dealer in 



Cboice flfoeats 



SAUSAGE A SPECIALTY 



ft. x ft. ft. x CITY MARKET 



Post=office Box 342 



RALEIGH, 



NORTH CAROLINA 



Neat, Tasty Printing attracts the attention of Business Men. Place 
your Order with us for this Class of Work. 



EDWARDS 




& BROUGHTON 


Bank 
Factory 






School 






Commercial 




Iprinters anb 


and General Printing 
County Officers' 


f~-\ 


Binbers - —> 


Supplies 

Legal Blanks, etc 






School 





Y 




Catalogues a 


k 


Stationers and Blank 


Specialty 






Book Manufacturers 

RALEIGH, = = NC 




)RTH CAROLINA 



We Sell Everything in Hardware 




NORTH STAR REFRIGERATORS 
ICE CREAM FREEZERS 



Cook stoves, ranges, heating stoves for 
wood or coal, furnaces, paint for houses, 
stains fur floors, enamels for hath tubs, 
hard oils for floors, Johnson floor wax. 
floor restorers, screen doors and win- 
dows, poultry netting, scissors, razors, 
knives and forks, carvers, Mail orders 
solicited. 

Money Back if Nol Suited 



HART - WARD HARDWARE 
COMPANY .>^j* Raleigh, N. C. 



Choice Selections 



PRICES AND CUTS ON 
APPLICATION 



Artistic furniture is like pointings by old masters, or like rare 
lace. It never loses its value and it never goes out of fashion. 
The aesthetically beautiful, the really artistic productions of the 
cabinet maker are a continuous and lasting delight to its possessors. 
Why invest in things which are commonplace and which soon 
become a constant source of displeasure, when for the same out- 
lay you can obtain really artistic furniture ? We will tell you 
how to go about it. Visit our warerooms and 3*011 will be de- 
lighted with our productions and astonished at the low prices we 
ask for them jt j* jt j* jl jt jt jt „« jt jt .jt jt .jt j* jt j* jt jt 



Royall & Borden Furniture Co. 



Cor. Wilmington and Hargett Sts. 



RALEIGH, N. C. 



FIRE! FIRE! 



t^ f 



Do You Feel Safe from Fire ? 

Have You Anything You 

Want Insured 



"> 



LOWEST RATES 
And Best Companies Guaranteed 



&5p 



Insure Your Life and Property With 

JOHN C. DREWRY 

220 Fayetteville St. RALEIGH, N. C. 



A FINE LINE OF LADIES' 

Patent Kid 
Oxford Ties 

"THE SHINY KIND." ONLY 
$2 00 A PAIR 



HELLER BROTHERS 



W. B Grimi-s 



W. W. Vass 



GRIMES & VASS 

Bonds 
Stocks and 
Investments 

FIRE INSURANCE 

126 Fayetteville St. Phone 415 



Dr. JOEL WHITAKER 

Dentist 



RALEIGH. 



NORTH CAROLINA 



CROSS & LINEHAN CO. 

Clothiers 



GENTS' FURNISHERS AND HATTERS 



A. B. Stronach Gatchel & Manning 

Company illustrators 

DESIGNERS 

AND 

ENGRAVERS 



DRY GOODS 
NOTIONS 
AND SHOES 



Philadelphia, = Pennsylvania 



Tfie Illustrations herein demonstrate our ability 



Visit or Send for Samples from 

Our Special Value De= 

partments of 



Dress Goods 

Silks 

Cotton Wash Goods 

Embroideries 

Laces and 

Ribbons 



A. B. Stronach Co. 

Fayetteville and Wilmington Sts. 

RALEIGH, N. C. 



JOHN S. PESCUD EJUS? 
Prescription Druggist 

TERMS CASH Prescriptions a Specialty 



CHARLES M. BRETSCH 

French Baker and Ice Cream Manufacturer 

Fine candles, cakes, rookies, cruller* and rolls. 

Best ice cream and neatest ladles' 

parlor in the eily. 

Interstate and 

Bell Phones No. 10J 108 Fayetteville Sim ' 



Trie Value of Reputation 



A reputation based mi half a century's 
experience, dealing directly with the 
women of the family all over the world. 
is unique, and stimulate* a wnrthy 
pride. The Singer ManufaclnringCom- 
panv aims io maintain Its well-earned 
reputation for fair dealing during all 
Lime. It is permanent, its stores are In 
every eily of Hie world, and parte and 
supplies for its machliieRran always he 
easily obtained. Sold on Installments. 
Old machines taken In exchange :: :: :: 



Trie Singer Manufacturing 
Company 



"Sewing Machine 
Makers for the World" 



RALEIGH. N. C. 



CROWELL'S DRUG STORE 



120 Fayettecille Street, Raleigh, N. C. 




A WAVE OF COOLNESS 



Seems to strike you, when you drink 
one of our large glasses of soda. There's 
a generous comfort in the glasses we 
serve. We use pure water, pure fruit 
syrups for the flavors, and our soda is 
as healthful as it is refreshing. You 
never drank soda anywhere else so 
good in every way. Try our chocolate 
ice cream soda :: :: :: :: :; ;: ;; 

CROWELL'S DRUG STORE 

120 Faijettecille St. RALEIGH, N. C. 



NORTH 
CAROLINA 




COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE AND 
MECHANIC ARTS 

Dr. GEO. T. WINSTON, President 



Raleigh, 



North Carolina 



PERRY & 
ROSENTHAL 



J. L. O'QUINN & COMPANY 
Florists 



ejfr 



All 

Latest 

Styles 

in 

Oxfords 

Just 

Received. 

Call 

and 

Give 

Us 

a 

Trial. 



K& 



Perry & Rosenthal 



Mail and telegraph orders promptly filltd. 
Carnations a specially. 



POT AND BEDDING 
PLANTS OF AM. KINIIS 



Phones 149 



Raleigh, N C. 



Anticephalalgine — 

THE WONDERFUL 
HEADACHE CURE 

25 and 50 Cents at all Druggists 

Manufactured by 

JAMES I. JOHNSON 



RALEIGH, 



NORTH CAROLINA 



M CL Our Shoes p. 

INeW OnOeS filand finish 




nd will be &lad to have you call. 



-POOL & ALLEN 



Not to be taken from this room